Coronavirus (COVID-19)
For health information and advice, read our pages on coronavirus. Learn about the government response to coronavirus on GOV.UK.
NEW PATIENTS:
 
NEWSLETTERS:
 
PRACTICE LEAFLETS:
 
 
CHILDRENS HEALTH
The NHS has provided a slideshow to demonstrate and explain the various conditions and illnesses that are affecting children.

The slideshow also advices you on how to diagnose and treat them and when to see consultation advice.

NHS Childhood Illness Slideshow

Parents, often experience the trials of an ill child, if you understand more about the illness, you can feel like you're the one in control.

Please click on the links below to open pages and advice on the latest childhood health conditions;

If you have any concerns about your child's health please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Friday 27th March 2020
WOMEN'S HEALTH
(SMEAR TESTS)

The aim of the NHS Cervical Screening Programme is to reduce the number of women who develop cervical cancer and the number of women who die from the condition.

Since the screening programme was introduced in the 1980s, the number of cervical cancer cases has decreased by about 7% each year.

All women who are registered with a GP are invited for cervical screening;

  • Aged 25 to 49 – every 3 years
  • Aged 50 to 64 – every 5 years
  • Over 65 – only women who haven't been screened since age 50 or those who have recently had abnormal tests

Being screened regularly means any abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix can be identified at an early stage and, if necessary, treated to stop cancer developing.

But cervical screening isn't 100% accurate and doesn't prevent all cases of cervical cancer.
Screening is a personal choice and you have the right to choose not to attend.

BOOKING YOUR APPOINTMENT
You'll receive a letter through the post asking you to make an appointment for a cervical screening test. The letter should contain the details of the place you need to contact for the appointment.

Screening is usually carried out by the practice nurse at your GP clinic. You can ask to have a female doctor or nurse.

If possible, try to book an appointment during the middle of your menstrual cycle (usually 14 days from the start of your last period), as this can ensure a better sample of cells is taken. 

It's best to make your appointment for when you don’t have your period.

If you use a spermicide, a barrier method of contraception or a lubricant jelly, you shouldn't use these for 24 hours before the test, as the chemicals they contain may affect the test.

The cervical screening test usually takes around 5 minutes to carry out.

You'll be asked to undress from the waist down and lie on a couch, although you can usually remain fully dressed if you're wearing a loose skirt.The doctor or nurse will gently put an instrument called a speculum into your vagina. This holds the walls of the vagina open so the cervix can be seen.

A small soft brush will be used to gently collect some cells from the surface of your cervix.

If you find the test painful, tell the doctor or nurse as they may be able to reduce your discomfort.

Try to relax as much as possible as being tense makes the test more difficult to carry out. Taking slow, deep breaths will help.

The cell sample is then sent off to a laboratory for analysis and you should receive the result within 2 weeks.

HPV VACCINATION
Since Sept 2008, theres has been a national program in place to vaccinate 12-13 year old girls against HPV. There is also a 3 year catch up campaign that offers the HPV vaccine to 12-18 year old girls. It is delivered through secondary schools, consisting of 3 injections over a 6 month period.

HPV is the name of a family of viruses effecting the skin and membranes lining up the body (cervic, anus, mouth and throat). There are more than 100 different types of the HPV virus and are classed as high and low risk.

  • HPV effecting the skin can be passed via skin-to-skin contact
  • HPV that effects the throat and mouth can be passed on through kissing
  • Genital HPV is spread via sexual intercourse
  • You can have the genital virus for years withouth any sign of it

HPV infections can be harmless or may cause genital warts, however some can cause Cancer. Most HPV infections clear up by themselves, but in some people the infection can last a long time, HPV infects the cells of the surface of the cervix where it can remain un-noticed without you knowing that it is there. The HPV virus can damage these cells leading to changes in their appearances.

The purpose of cervical screening is to detect these changes, and if picked up early enough, can be treated to prevent cancer from developing. If left un-treated, ccancer can develop, leading to serious illness and death.

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Friday 27th March 2020
MENS HEALTH
Please click on the links below to open pages and advice on the latest men's health conditions;

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Friday 27th March 2020
SEXUAL HEALTH
There are some STI's, like Chlamydia, that you could be carrying around, without realising it as it has no noticeable symptoms. Chlamydia affects fertility, therefore it is important to make use of the sexxual health services for free on the NHS.

Please click on the links below to open pages and advice on the latest women's health conditions;

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Friday 27th March 2020
HEALTHY LIVING
It's easy to take your health for granted. By following a healthy lifestyle yo can reduce the risk of getting serioulsy ill, you will feel better and it will to improve your immune system.

ALCOHOL
In small quantities, alcohol can actually be beneficial to health. In large quantities, on a regular basis, it can have a very serious negative effect on health. At one extreme it can kill. cirrhosis of the liver, for instance, is killing an increasing number of people, as are drivers who are over the limit.

An accepted safe limit is 21 units a week for men and 14 units for women, a unit being approximately a glass of wine, half a pint of beer or a single measure of spirit This recommended maximum presumes that the consumption is spread throughout the week and not consumed all at once in a 'binge'.

SMOKING ADVICE AND HELPING YOU TO QUIT
  • Over 100,000 people die each year in the UK from smoking-related diseases
  • Every cigarette you smoke can shorten your life by an average of five and a half minutes
  • Babies of smokers are, on average, 200 grammes smaller than those of non smokers
  • Smokers smell.

HOW TO GIVE UP
Stopping smoking is all about motivation. Without the real desire to give up you are unable to succeed. You must want to give up rather than feel you should give up. Set a date a week or so in the future when you intend to stop.

  • Tell all your friends, relations and work colleagues that you're giving up on that day and ask for their support and encouragement. If at all possible, find someone to give up with you
  • When the big day comes, plan it carefully with plenty to keep you occupied
  • Avoid situations where the desire to smoke will be strongest such as whilst drinking
  • Finally, carefully put the money you would have spent on cigarettes on one side, each day, to save up for some special treat as a reward

SMOKEFREE
The NHS have a service, simply called "Smokefree" to inform everyone of the dangers, the benefits and how they can simply kick the habit.

QUIT
QUIT are an independent charity whos aim is to save live by healping smokers to stop.

Smokers wanting to QUIT should email stopsmoking@quit.org.uk for free, individual, same-day advice from their trained counsellors.

STOP SMOKING WIDGET
This tool gives you daily messages, and keeps track of how much you're saving and how many days it has been since your last cigarette.

DIET
  • Ultimately, a bad diet can lead to serious problems such as heart disease
  • A good diet helps fight off disease and makes you look and feel good

EIGHT WAYS TO KEEP HEALTHY

  1. Blood Pressure - Has yours been checked in the past five years?
  2. Smoking - More and more people are giving up smoking. There are various programmes available to help you give up
  3. Overweight - Some people are overweight, chances are you weigh more than you should
  4. Exercise - Regular exercise 30 minutes per day when your heart beats faster, you get out of breath and you sweat
  5. Relaxation - Tension and anxiety can be helped by a psychologist, counselor, or quiet room
  6. Alcohol - Can be your best friend, but your worst enemy
  7. Cervical Smears - We recommend women should have regular three yearly cervical smears
  8. Tetanus Prevention - We will check if you are immune and bring your cover up to date

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Friday 27th March 2020
OBESITY
WHAT IS OBESITY?
Obesity is the term used when weight reaches a level that can affect your health, it is diagnosed if your "body mass index" is above 30.

Your nurse or doctor can tell you what you BMI is. In most cases, putting on weigh is the resul of unhealthy easting behaviours, unhealthy food choices and low levels of activity.

There are also many problems associated with being overweight and these include personal, social and health problems such as;

  • Feeling down and unhappy
  • Being teased
  • Diabetes
  • Heart problems

Before you can make the changes to remove these problems and acheive your desired weight, you need to become aware and understand your current eating and exercise habits;

  • Over-eating
  • Low levels of excercise
  • cravings
  • Time
  • Stress

Based on the body mass index, people are categorized as normal weight, overwight, or obese;

MEANING
BMI
Nomal Weight 18.5-24.9
Overweight 25-29.9
Obese 30-3.,9
Severely Obese 40 and above

 

 

 

To calculate your BMI, click here

"The key to achieving your goals is to remind yourself why you can't lose weight, this will keep you motivated"

Busy lives, changes in technology, not walking because of the use of the car lead to the changes in which we are not always taking the time to eat healthy. People follow diets and lose weight, but then they return to a previous pattern and find that they put on weight, to be consistent, develop new habits and change the way in which food fits into yoyur life.

Changing the way you feel about eating and excercise can give you many rewards;

  • Improved health
  • Feeling of having more energy
  • Changes in everyday aspects of lives
  • Sleeping

SERIOUS HEALTH CONDITIONS
Being obese can also increase the risk of developing many potentially serious health conditions, including;

  • Type 2 diabetes - A condition that causes a blood sugar level to become too high
  • High blood presssure
  • High cholesterol and atherosclerosis (where fatty deposits narrow your arteries), which can lead to coronary heart disease and stroke
  • Asthma
  • Metabolic syndrome - A combination of diabetes' high blood pressure and obesity
  • Bowel, breast and womb cancers
  • Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) - Where stomach acid leaks out of the stomach and into the oesophagus (gullet)
  • Gallstones - Small stones made out of cholesterol, that form in the gallbladder
  • Reduce fertility
  • Osteoarthritis - A condition involving pain and stiffness in your joints
  • Sleep apnoea - A condition that cause interrupted breathing during sleep, which can lead to to daytime sleepiness with an increased risk of road traffice accidents, as well as a greater risk of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease
  • Liver and kidney disease
  • Preganancy complications - such as gestational diabetes or pre-eclampsia (when a woman experiences a potentially dangerous rise of blood pressure during pregnancy

Obesity reduces life expectancy by an average of 3-10 years. depending on how severe it is. It's estimated that obeisty and being overweight conribute to at least 1 in every 13 deaths in Europe.

SETTING REALISTIC GOALS
Make sure that you set yourself realistic goals. Start off with small changes, building them up to larger ones.

There's no "quick fix" for obesity. Weight loss programmes take time and commitment, and work best when fully completed. The healthcare professionals involved with your care should provide encouragement and advice about how to maintain the weight loss achieved.

Regularly monitoring your weight, setting realistic goals and involving your friends and family with your attempts to lose weight can also help.

Remember that even losing what seems like a small amount of weight, such as 3% or more of your original body weight, and maintaining this for life, can significantly reduce your risk of developing obesity-related complications like diabetes and heart disease.

If it's been a long time since you did any exercise, you should check out the NHS Choices Couch to 5K running plan.

It consists of podcasts delivered over the course of nine weeks and has been specifically designed for absolute beginners.

To begin with, you start running for short periods of time, and as the plan progresses, gradually increase the amount.

At the end of the nine weeks, you should be able to run for 30 minutes non-stop, which for most people is around five kilometres (3.1 miles).

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Monday 24th February 2020
USEFUL PATIENT INFORMATION - NHS HEALTH GUIDES
Please click on the links below to open pages and advice on the latest NHS Guides;

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Friday 27th March 2020

Changing Health is a digital service designed to help you manage your Type 2 diabetes and create a positive lifestyle change.

Through the mobile APP, you'll gain access to:

  • Clinical education on a diet and excercise that you can view whenever and wherever you like.
  • A lifestyle coach who will help you set and achieve simple lifestyle goals.

Start taking control of your diabetes today!

The surgery currently has limited spaces available on this course.

For more information on how this service could benefit you, and to register for Changing Health, simply contact us at;

www.changinghealth.com/wfx

HEALTHUNLOCKED
HealthUnlocked is a social network for health. By finding others with similar health backgrounds people can take on day to day health concerns together. And because our communities are set up by leading health organisations people have access to credible support.

We believe good health information is good for your health. HealthUnlocked has been built to get good support to the people who need it.

Please click on the links below to open pages and advice on the latest NHS online advice communities;

 
Couch to 5k Diabetes Research & Healthy Eating British Heart Foundation IBS
       
British Lung Foundation Men's Health Forum Pain Concern Weight Loss NHS NCT
       
       
         
Website updated on Friday 27th March 2020      
ANTIBIOTICS GUARDIAN
No one likes being sick and it's especially upseeting when someone in your family is ill. If you or a member of your family are feeling unwell, have a cold or flu and you haven't been prescribed antibiotics;
  • Ask our onsite pharmacy to recommend medication to to assist with the symptoms of pain
  • Get plenty of rest
  • Make sure that your or your child drink enough to to avoid being thirsty
  • Fever is a sign of the body fighting the infection and usually gets better as time progresses. You can use paractemol if you or your child become uncomfortable due to the effects of the fever
  • Make sure that you have a tissue for your nose and wash your hands to avoid spreading your infection to family and friends

HOW LONG SHOULD THE SYMPTOMS LAST FOR?
Illnesses and symptoms should last for;

COMMON ILLNESSES
MOST PEOPLE ARE BETTER BY
Earache (Middle Ear Infection)
8 Days
Sore Throat
7-8 Days
Sinusitis (Adults Only)
14-21 Days
Cold
14 Days
Cold Or Bronchitis
21 Days

 

 

 

 

If you're not starting to improve by the above guides times, please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment, or call NHS 111

THESE SYSMPTOMS ARE POSSIBLE SIGNS OF SERIOUS ILLNESS AND SHOULD BE ASSESSED URGENTLY BY ONE OF OUR GP'S

  1. If your skin is very cold or has a strange colour, or you have developed an unusual rash
  2. If you feel comfused or have slurred peech or you are very drowsy
  3. If you have difficulty breathing, signs can include;
  • Breathing quickly
  • Turning blue around your lips and the skin below the mouth
  • Skin between or above the ribs getting sucked or pulled with every breath
  1. If you develope a severe headache and are sick
  2. if you develop chest pain
  3. If you have difficulty swallowing or you are drolling
  4. If you cough up blood
  5. If you are feeling a lot worse

If you or your child has any of these symptoms, are getting worse or are feeling sicker than usual (even if your. their temperature falls), contact NHS 111. If please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment, or call NHS 111 urgently. if a child is under the age of 5 or has any of the symptoms 1-3, go to A&E immediatly or call 999.

WHEN ANTIBIOTICS ARE NEEDED
Antibiotics are needed for serious bacterial infections including;

  • Sepsis
  • Pneumonia
  • Urinary Tract Infections
  • Sexually Transmittted Infections like Gonorrhoea
  • Menigococcal Meningitis

If you're worried, please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment with one of our GP's who will be able to advise you on the best treatment for your symptoms and remember

NEVER SHARE ANTIBIOTICS OR KEEP THEM FOR LATER USE

 

 

RESOURCES

 
Become an Antibiotic Guardian and protect yourself, your family and friends against the spread of antibiotic resistance. Visit our website for more information and advice
Page updated on Friday 27th March 2020    
CORONAVIRUS
Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a new respiratory illness that has not previously been seen in humans. NHS Emgland and Public Health England (PHE) are extremely well prepared for outbreaks of new infectious diseases. The NHS has put in place measures to ensure the safety of all patients and NHS staff while also ensuring services are available to the public as normal.

The risk of being in close contact with a person with Coronavirus or contaminated surfaces is very low at the current time, as members of the public who have visited Wuhan or Hubei province, China are currently in isolation.

Health professionals are working to contact anyone who has been in close contact with people who have Coronavirus.

SYMPTOMS OF THE CORONAVIRUS
Symptoms usually include:

  • A cough
  • A a high temperature
  • Difficulty breathing
 

HOW IS THE CORONAVIRUS SPREAD BETWEEN PEOPLE?
Because it's a new illness, we do not know exactly how Coronavirus spreads from person to person, but similar viruses spread by cough droplets.

ADVICE FOR PEOPLE RETURNING TO THE UK AND TRAVELLERS TO THE UK
Call 111 now if you've been to any of the following countries or places;

- Cambodia
- Myanmar (Burma)
- China
- Singapore
- Hong kong
- South Korea
- Italy - only Northern Italy (anywhere North of Pisa,
- Tenerife - only the H10 Costa Adeje
  Florence and Rimini)   Palace Hotel
- Japan
- Taiwan
- Laos - Thailand
- Macau - Vietnam
- Malaysia  

Although the practice no longer offers travel immunisations, a document has been produced to provide travellers to and from the UK on the latest developments of the Coronavirus.

Please select your document from the list below;

CORONAVIRUS TRAVEL ADVICE
Albanian Arabic Bulgarian Chinese (Cantonese) Chinese (Mandarin) English
French Hindi Italian Lithuanian Portuguese Polish
Romanian Russian Spanish Urdu        

Patient's who feel that they may have Coronavirus or may have come into contact with someone who has, the NHS 111 has created Coronavirus pages to inform patient's on what to do based on the above.

These can be accessed at https://111.nhs.uk/service/covid-19.

Everyone is being reminded to follow Public Health England advice to:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • Aways wash your hands when you get home or into work
  • Use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • Put used tissues in the bin straight away and wash your hands afterwards
  • Try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell

Do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

  • Antibiotics do not help, as they do not work against viruses.
  • Treatment aims to relieve the symptoms while your body fights the illness.
  • You'll need to stay in isolation away from other people until you've recovered.

CORONAVIRUS RISK CLASSES
The full list of risk classes from Friday 27th March 2020 is as follows,

  1. Individual's ages 70 or older (regardless of mental conditions)
  2. Individual's under 70 with;
  • Underlying health conditions (anyone instructed to get a flu jab as an adult each year on medical grounds) Chronic (long-term) respiratory diseases, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Emphysema or Bronchitis
  1. Individual's under 70 suffering with;
  • Chronic Heart Disease, Liver Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Motor-Neuron Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Learning Disabilities, Cerebral Palsy, Diabetes
  1. Individual's with;
  • Sickle Cell Disease or those who have had their spleen removed
  • Individual's with weakened immune systems resulting from HIV, AIDS, Steroid Tablets or Chemotherapy
  • Individual's with a BMI of 40 or above
  1. Pregnant women
  1. Individuals who;
  • Have received an organ transplant and remain on ongoing immunosuppression medication
  • Are Cancer patient's undergoing active Chemotherapy or Radiotherapy
  1. Individual's with;
  • Cancers of the blood or bone marrow, such as Leukaemia who are at any stage of treatment
  • Severe chest conditions such as Cystic Fibrosis or severe Asthma (requiring hospital admission or courses of Steroid Tablets)
  • Severe diseases of body systems, such as Kidney Disease (Dialysis)

HOW TO SELF-ISOLATE IF YOU'RE ASKED TO
If there's a chance you could have Coronavirus, you may be asked to stay away from other people (self-isolate).

This means you should;

  • Stay at home
  • Not go to work, school or public places
  • Not use public transport or taxis
  • Ask friends, family members or delivery services to do errands for you
  • Try to avoid visitors to your home – it's OK for friends, family or delivery drivers to drop off food

You may need to do this for up to 14 days to help reduce the possible spread of infection.

If anyone living in a household has been asked to self-isolate, the whole household has to self-isolate for 14 days.

If you have been told to stay at home because of the coronavirus and need a note for your employer, there is a service for patients who;

  • Have symptoms of the coronavirus and have the used NHS 111 coronavirus service
  • Have been told by a healthcare professional that they have the symptoms of the coronavirus
  • Live with someone who has the symptoms of the coronavirus

If you have to stay at home but feel wel enough to work, ask your employer if you can work from home. If you can work from home, you will not need an isolation notice. You can also use this service for someone else.

More advice can be found from the links below;

The practice has prepared documents for self-isolation to provide our patients with advice if they have been diagnosed as postive Coronavirus patient's.

Please select your document from the list below;

CORONAVIRUS SELF-ISOLATION ADVICE
Albanian Arabic Bulgarian Chinese (Cantonese) Chinese (Mandarin) English
French Hindi Italian Lithuanian Portuguese Polish
Romanian Russian Spanish Urdu        

TESTING FOR THE CORONAVIRUS
NHS 111 has an online Coronavirus service that can tell you if you need medical help and advise you of what to do.

Use this service if;

  • You think you have Coronavirus
  • You've recently been to a country or area with a high risk of Coronavirus, for more information visit the Coronavirus advice foe traveller's website
  • You've been in close contact with someone with Coronavirus

Patient's who feel that they may have Coronavirus or may have come into contact with someone who has, the NHS 111 has created Coronavirus pages to inform patient's on what to do based on the above.

These can be accessed at https://111.nhs.uk/service/covid-19.

You will be told the right place to be tested by NHS 111

AT THE HOSPITAL                

STEP 1
Follow the signs to the Coronavirus isolation pod

STEP 2
Inside the pod call NHS 111

STEP 3
A nurse wearing protective clothing will appear
STEP 4
Swabs will be taken for testing
STEP 5
Self-isolate at home or elsewhere
DRIVE THROUGH FACILITY HOME VISIT

You will be tested without leaving your car

NHS staff will visit your home

The practice has prepared documents for self-isolation advice for our patient's who have to self-isolate.

Please select your document from the list below;

TESTING ADVICE FOR SELF-ISOLATION PATIENTS
Albanian Arabic Bulgarian Chinese (Cantonese) Chinese (Mandarin) English
French Hindi Italian Lithuanian Portuguese Polish
Romanian Russian Spanish Urdu        

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Friday 27th March 2020
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L.L. Medical Care Ltd (Agarwal And Agrawal Practice), Langthorne Health Centre, 13 Langthorne Road, Leytonstone, London, E11 4HX