~ CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) ~
Click here or more health information and advice, read our pages on Coronavirus - Click here for more information about the government guidelines - Click here for more information on the details of the Coronavirus exit roadmap - Click here for more information about how Coronavirus vaccinations are being delivered in Waltham Forest and the rest of London
NEW PATIENTS:
 
NEWSLETTERS:
 
CORONAVIRUS:
 
 
CARER'S SUPPORT
Carer's are adult and young individuals who help to support those in need (friend, relatives, those who have mental issues or need that extra bit of care).

The following are the most commonly used organisations that support carer's throughout the the country;

  • Carer's First - You can contact us by calling our Carer's Hub on 030 0303 1555 where someone will be available to take your calll. Our Carers Hub team are available Monday-Thursday 9am - 5pm, Fridays 9am - 4:30pm. For more information visit; https://www.carersfirst.org.uk/waltham-forest.
  • Carer's UK - You can contact us by calling our carer's Hub on 020 7378 4999 where someone will be able to take you call. For more information visit; https://www.carersuk.org/home.

CORONAVIRUS - FURTHER SUPPORT
The NHS has written to everyone considered to be at risk of severe illness if you catch the coronavirus. You may have received the letter yourself, either as someone in this ‘high risk’ group or as the named carer of someone else who is.

If a person you care for has received this letter, the instructions are very clear. They must stay at home at all times and avoid all face-to-face contact for at least 12 weeks, except from you as their carer and healthcare workers continuing to provide essential medical care.

However, if you start to display any of the symptoms of coronavirus you must suspend your face-to-face visits. If this means that the person you care for will be even more vulnerable, for example because they will no longer receive the essential supplies that you bring them, the government has set up a dedicated helpline for vulnerable people seeking additional care.

If you have received an NHS letter or are caring for someone who has, you can register for further support here www.gov.uk/cornonavirus-extremely-vulnerable or call 0800 028 8327, the government’s new dedicated helpline.

PEOPLE AT HIGH RISK FROM CORONAVIRUS
People at high risk from Coronavirus include people who;

  • Have had an organ transplant
  • Are having chemotherapy or antibody treatment for cancer, including immunotherapy
  • Are having an intense course of radiotherapy (radical radiotherapy) for lung cancer
  • Are having targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system (such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors)
  • Have blood or bone marrow cancer (such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma)
  • Have had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant in the past 6 months, or are still taking immunosuppressant medicine
  • Have been told by a doctor they you have a severe lung condition (such as cystic fibrosis, severe asthma or severe COPD)
  • Have a condition that means they have a very high risk of getting infections (such as SCID or sickle cell)
  • Are taking medicine that makes them much more likely to get infections (such as high doses of steroids)
  • Were born with a serious heart condition and are pregnant
  • Are pregnant

If you're at high risk from coronavirus, you should have received a letter from the NHS.

Speak to your GP or hospital care team if you have not been contacted and think you should have been.

PEOPLE AT MODERATE RISK (CLINICALLY VULNERABLE)
People at moderate risk from Coronavirus include people who;

  • Are 70 or older
  • Are pregnant
  • Have a lung condition that's not severe (such as asthma, COPD, emphysema or bronchitis)
  • Have heart disease (such as heart failure)
  • Have diabetes
  • Have chronic kidney disease
  • Have liver disease (such as hepatitis)
  • Have a condition affecting the brain or nerves (such as Parkinson's disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy)
  • Have a condition that means they have a high risk of getting infections
  • Are taking medicine that can affect the immune system (such as low doses of steroids)
  • Are very obese (a BMI of 40 or above)
It is currently recommended that you follow the following advice at least until the end of June 2020;
GENERAL HEALTH
Wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
Always wash your hands when you get home from work
Use hand sanatiser, if soap and water are not available
Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing
Put tissues in the bin straight away and wash your hands afterwards
Prepare a hospital bag, including a list of the medicines you're taking, in case you need to go into hospital
Stay at home at all times – do not leave your home to buy food, collect medicine or exercise
Get food and medicine delivered and left outside your door – ask friends and family to help or register to get coronavirus support on GOV.UK if you need it
Spend as little time as possible in shared rooms, for example, the kitchen and sitting areas
Stay at least 1 metre (3 ft), 1m plus rule in close contact areas, away from other people in your home as much as possible
Use separate towels, including hand towels and tea towels
Make sure anyone who comes into your home washes their hands with soap and water for 20 seconds
Clean objects and surfaces you touch often (such as door handles, kettles and phones) using your regular cleaning products
Clean cutlery, dishes and pans thoroughly
Clean a shared bathroom each time you use it, for example by wiping the surfaces you have touched
DO NOT DO ANY OF THE FOLLOWING
Do not touch your eyes, nose and mouth if your hands are not clean
Do not go to work
Avoid public transport
Do not have visitors in your home, including friends and family, unless they're providing essential care
Do not stop taking any prescription medicines without speaking to your doctor

WHAT SHALL I TELL PEOPLE WHO ARE VISITING AS CARE WORKERS?
Let friends and family know that they should only visit if providing essential care such as washing, administering medication, dressing and preparing meals. The government has provided specific guidance about this on this page – see ‘What is the advice for visitors including those who are providing care for you?’

If you have a care worker employed by an agency, check what their policy is. Also check how the person being cared for feels about any decisions you need to make. Their welfare is of course paramount and they should be part of any decision made.

If in the instance a regular paid care worker was unable to come in because of contracting the virus, check whether anyone else would be able to step in temporarily if needed to provide essential support such as administering medication, obviously taking the utmost precautions.

I CARE FOR SOMEONE WHO IS CONSIDERED TO BE IN THE "HIGH-RISK" GROUP FOR CORONAVIRUS. SHOULD I SELF-ISOLATE?
At the moment, government guidance only requires people to self isolate if they are displaying symptoms of coronavirus or someone in their household is displaying symptoms. If you are self-isolating, you need to stay indoors at all times. See this NHS website page for more details. If the person you are living with and caring for has received a letter from the NHS, they must stay at home at all times and avoid all face-to-face contact for at least 12 weeks, except from those providing essential medical care which may include you as their carer (unless you develop symptoms).

FURTHER INFORMATION
For further information please speak to one of our receptionists.

or, visit the , you can download and print a referral form from here.

To view our Carer's Policy, click here

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021

IMMUNISATIONS
The surgery provides medical serives for all types of vaccinations amd immunistions, including child and travel vaccinations. Influenza (Flu) vaccinations are offered to over 65 year olds, high risk patients, such as Asthma COPD, Diabeteics and Heart Disease patients once a year from October to December.

Face masks and coverings are to be worn at all times by all GP's, nurses, visitors and patients.

FACE MASKS AND COVERINGS EXCEPTIONS - IF YOU ARE MEDICALLY EXEMPT FROM WEARING A MASK OR FACE COVERING

  1. Exception from face covering badges (for a mobile phone)
  2. Exception from face covering badges (to print)
  3. Exception from face covering card (to print)

Some people may feel more comfortable showing something that says they do not have to wear a face covering. This could be in the form of an exemption card, badge or even a home-made sign.

BOOKING APPOINTMENTS FOR 8 WEEK (2 MONTHS) PARENT AND BABY IMMS
During the Coronavirus pandemic, all young babies will continue to receive their 2 month (8 week) checks and immunisations from the practice. Patient's should contact the practice to make an appointment for themselves and their baby or babies, with one of our GP's and nurses. Post-natal appointments can also be made with the nurse.

COVID-19 VACCINE - 29TH APRIL 2021

  • If you are aged 40 or over
  • You'll turn 40 before 1st July 2021
  • You are at high risk from coronavirus (clinically extremely vulnerable)
  • If you are a frontline health and social care worker
  • You have a condition that puts you at higher risk (clinically vulnerable)
  • If you are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or if you are the main carer of an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if you fall ill
  • If have a learning dificulty
  • If you think you are an eligible unpaid carer who has not been contacted for your coronavirus please contact one of our receptionists

If you were under 30 years old on March 2021, you will not be offered appointments for the Oxford Astra\Zeneca vaccine. There maybe fewer appointments available to you, or you may hav to travel further.

If you are pregnant, speak to a healthcare professional from your maternity team or one of our GP's before booking your vaccine. It's preferred that you hvave the Maderna or Phizer/BioNTech vaccines, which are not available at all vaccination sites.

Please contact your GP to book your COVID-19 vaccine or wait for your GP or council to contact you. or you can book on the national booking online system or use the staff booking system applicable in your work place.

We are sending out patients to the Covid-19 vaccination hub at; Walthamstow Library, Central Library High Street, London E17 7JN

  • Walthamstow Library, Central Library High Street, London E17 7JN

Click here for directions and maps to the above vaccination centre

The NHS is prioritising vaccinating people who experts have agreed will benefit the most. We will let you know when it is your turn. Please see here for advice.

There is comprehensive information, guidance, and answers to questions, including vaccination information for frontline health and social care staff, carers and clinical vulnerable at COVID-19 Vaccination programme | East London Health & Care Partnership

GETTING THE HELP YOU NEED
The NHS in London is very busy as coronavirus infection rates continue to be high, but we’ll help you get urgent care when you need it.

Most consultations are over the phone and via video. This is for everyone's safety. We will assess your situation and invite you into the practice if needed.

We can arrange same-day appointments if you need urgent care but please don't visit without an appointment. Appointments will be held in the best way to keep you safe from Covid.

You can also contact 111, day or night, for other urgent health advice - including if you have concerns about your Covid-19 symptoms.

Please remember that 999 and A&E are for emergencies.

Please help reduce infections, protect the NHS and keep each other safe by following the latest rules.

The 3 current Covid-19 vaccination centres in our area are;

  • Leyton Healthcare, 4th Floor, Oliver Road Polyclinic, 75 Oliver Road, Leyton, London, E10 5LG
  • Forest Road Medical Centre, 354-358 Forest Road, Walthamstow, London, E17 5JL
  • Coronavirus Vaccination Hub, Westfield Stratford City, 2 Stratford Place, Westfield Stratford City, Montfichet Road, Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London E20 1EJ (The unit is located on The Street opposite Chestnut Plaza, Tempur, Zara Home and David’s Bridal shops)

Click here for directions and maps to the above vaccination centres

On-entry to the Health centre you will be asked by the health centre security guard to make sure that you are wearing face masks or face coverings, he will ask if you are exempt, and will ask you to santatize your hands. The service is provided by Ptotec Security.

THE COMPLETE ROUTINE IMMUNISATION SCHEDULE FROM JUNE 2020

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021
SHINGLES
Shingles, or Herpes Zoster, is condition caused by a re-occurance of the Chickenpox virus. After you've had the virus, the virus stays inactive in your nervous system and can re-introduce later on in life, causing shingles. It is not clear what causes the virus to reactivate, but it occurs more in the elderly and causes a painful rash on one side of the body.

Around 1 in 4 adults can develop shingles in their lifetime. The immune system weakens as we get older, increasing the chances of Shingles, more severe in people aged over 70-75, or 78-79 years of age.

The symptoms of shingles can range from mild to severe and can be very unpleasant.

Shingles affects one side of the body, on the trunkm head, neck or the eye, starting with a headache and tiredness. It is common to feel tingling or burning sensations in the area of the skin before a rash appears. From a few days to 3 weeks, a severe red rash appears, which eventually turns in very painful fluid-filled blisters.

After a few days, the blisters dry out and take 2 - 4 weeks to heal, with most people recovering, however some can may experience long-term effects;

  • Post-herpetic Neurolgia (PHN) - An unpleasant nerve pain lasting from weeks to months, or years for a few people. PHN affects the quality of life and even a slight breeze against the skin can very painful. The older you are the more pain you are most likely to be in
  • Sometimes shingles can develop in the eye affecting the skin or the eyelid, causing severe pain, decreased vision and blindness in the affected eye
  • Scarring
  • Skin Infections
  • Hearing Loss

TREATMENTS
Shingles varies from person to person, while some require treatment. See your GP as soon as possible, within 72 hours of the rash occuring, as early treatment can help to reduce the risk of complications. You may also be prescribed painkilling or antiviral medication.

Face masks and coverings are to be worn at all times by all GP's, nurses, visitors and patients.

 

Face masks and coverings are to be worn at all times by all GP's, nurses, visitors and patients.

FACE MASKS AND COVERINGS EXCEPTIONS - IF YOU ARE MEDICALLY EXEMPT FROM WEARING A MASK OR FACE COVERING

  1. Exception from face covering badges (for a mobile phone)
  2. Exception from face covering badges (to print)
  3. Exception from face covering card (to print)

Some people may feel more comfortable showing something that says they do not have to wear a face covering. This could be in the form of an exemption card, badge or even a home-made sign.

PREVENTION
The Department of Health has introduced a National Shingles Immunisation Program to protect those at risk, the vaccination is recommended for people aged over 70-75, or 78-79 years of age, however not everyone will be eligible this year. If you are eligible, you will be asked to visit your GP.

From September 2019, people aged over 70-75, or 78-79 years of age are eligible for the vaccination, other age groups will be introduced in the futures ensuring that people aged 70-75, or 78-79 years of age are offered the Shingles vaccination.

Read the patient information leaflet (PIL) for Zostavax.

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

For test results, please contact the practice between 2.30PM and 4.30PM

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021
FLU IN ADULTS
Flu vaccination is available every year on the NHS to help protect adults and children at risk from flu and its complications.

Flu can be unpleasant, but if you're otherwise healthy, it'll usually clear up on its own in about a week.

But flu can be more severe in certain people, such as:

  • Adults aged between 50 and 64
  • Adults 65 and over
  • People with certain medical conditions (including children in at-risk groups from 6 months of age)
  • Pregnant women
  • People living with someone who's at high risk from coronavirus (on the NHS shielded patient list)
  • Children aged 2 and 3 on 31 August 2020
  • Children in primary school
  • Children in year 7 (secondary school)
  • Frontline health or social care workers

Anyone in these risk groups is more likely to develop potentially serious complications of flu, such as pneumonia (a lung infection), so it's recommended that they have a flu vaccine every year to help protect them.

Later in the year, the flu vaccine may be given to people aged 50 to 64. More information will be available later in the autumn.

However, if you're aged 50 to 64 and in an at-risk group, you should not delay having your flu vaccine

WHICH TYPE PF FLU VACCINE SHOULD I HAVE?
There are several types of flu vaccine.

If you're eligible for the flu vaccine on the NHS, you'll be offered one that's most effective for you, depending on your age:

  • Children aged 2 to 17 are offered a live vaccine (LAIV) as a nasal spray; the live viruses have been weakened so it cannot give you flu
  • Adults aged 18 to 64 are offered an injected inactivated vaccine; there are different types, but none contains live viruses so they cannot give you flu
  • Adults aged 65 and over are offered an injected inactivated vaccine; the most common one contains an adjuvant to help your immune system have a stronger response to the vaccine

If your child is aged between 6 months and 2 years old and is in a high-risk group for flu, they'll be offered an injected flu vaccine because the nasal spray is not licensed for children under 2.

 

APPOINTMENTS FOR ALL AGE GROUPS ARE NOW AVAILABLE. PLEASE CALL THE PRACTICE TO BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT. ALL IMMUNISATIONS ARE ADMINSTERED ON TUESDAYS AND WEDNESDAYS - PLEASE ENSURE THAT YOU ARE WEARING MASK/FACE COVERINGS AND GLOVES

Talk to a GP, practice nurse or pharmacist for more information about these vaccines.

Find out more about who should have the flu vaccine.

PEOPLE AGED 65 AND OVERS AND THE FLU VACCINE
You can have your NHS flu vaccine at:

  • Your GP surgery
  • A local pharmacy offering the service
  • Your midwifery service if they offer it for pregnant women

Some community pharmacies now offer flu vaccination to adults (but not children) at risk from flu, including pregnant women, people aged 65 and over, people with long-term health conditions and carers.

If you have your flu vaccine at a pharmacy, you do not have to inform a GP. It's up to the pharmacist to do that.

HOW EFFECTIVE IS THE FLU VACCINE?
Flu vaccine is the best protection we have against an unpredictable virus that can cause unpleasant illness in children and severe illness and death among at-risk groups, including older people, pregnant women and people with an underlying physical health condition.

Studies have shown that the flu vaccine will help prevent you getting the flu.

It will not stop all flu viruses and the level of protection may vary, so it's not a 100% guarantee that you'll be flu-free.

But if you do get flu after vaccination, it's likely to be milder and shorter-lived than it would otherwise have been.

There's also evidence to suggest that the flu vaccine can reduce your risk of having a stroke.

Over time, protection from the injected flu vaccine gradually decreases and flu strains often change.

New flu vaccines are produced each year, which is why people advised to have the flu vaccine need it every year.

Find out more about how the flu vaccine works.

FLU VACCINE SIDE EFFECTS
Serious side effects of the injected flu vaccine are very rare.

You may have a mild high temperature and aching muscles for a couple of days after having the vaccine, and your arm may be a bit sore where you were injected.

Side effects of the nasal spray vaccine can commonly include a runny or blocked nose, a headache, tiredness and some loss of appetite.

Find out more about the side effects of the flu vaccine.

HOW SAFE IS THE FLU FLU VACCINE?
The flu vaccines used in the national programme have a good safety record.

Flu vaccines that are used in England have been thoroughly tested before they're made available.

WHEN TO THE HAVE A FLU VACCINE
The The best time to have a flu vaccine is in the autumn before flu starts circulating.

But even if it's later, it's always worth getting vaccinated. Ask the GP or pharmacist.

THE FLU VACCINE FOR 2020 TO 2021
Each year, the viruses that are most likely to cause flu are identified in advance and the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends which type of flu virus strains to include in the vaccine.

IS THERE ANYONE WHO SHOULD NOT HAVE THE FLU VLU VACCINE?
Most adults can have the injected flu vaccine, but you should avoid it if you have had a serious allergic reaction to a flu vaccine in the past.

Read more about who should not have the flu vaccine.

You can find out more by reading the answers to common questions people have about the flu vaccine.

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Thursday 16th July 2019, next review date due: Saturday 16th July 2022

FLU IN CHILDREN
AT WHAT AGE SHOULD CHILDREN HAVE THE NASAL SPRAY FLU VACCINE?
In the Autumn/winter of 2019/2020, the vaccine will be available free on the NHS for eligible children, including:

  • Children aged 2 and 3 on August 31 2020 – that is, children born between September 1st 2016 and August 31st 2018
  • All primary school children
  • Children aged 2 to 17 with long-term health conditions

Over the next few years the programme will be extended gradually to include older children.

If you receive a text or call, please book an appointment as soon as possible for your child's vaccination.

Face masks and coverings are to be worn at all times by all GP's, nurses, visitors and patients.

WHO WILL GIVE THE CHILDREN'S FLU VACCINATION
Children aged 2 and 3 years will be given the vaccination at their general practice, usually by the practice nurse.

Children that are 4 years old are also eligible for flu vaccination provided they were 4 on the 31 August 2020 .

These children should be offered the vaccination at their general practice.

Primary school children will be offered the vaccination in school. In a couple of areas, it might be offered in primary care settings.

Children who are home educated will also be offered the vaccine, provided they are in an eligible age group. Parents can obtain information about arrangements from their local NHS England Public Health Commissioning team.

CHLIDREN AT HIGH RISK FROM THE FLU
Children with long-term health conditions, such as diabetes, serious heart conditions, underlying neurological problems and kidney or liver disease, are at higher risk from flu.

 

They're more likely to get severely ill if they catch flu and it could make their existing condition worse. This means it's especially important that they're vaccinated.If your child is aged between 6 months and 2 years old and is in a high-risk group for flu, they'll be offered an injected flu vaccine.

This is because the nasal spray is not licensed for children under the age of 2.

Some children over the age of 2 who are in a high-risk group will also need to have an injected vaccine if the vaccine is not suitable for them.

WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF THE FLU NASAL SPRAY FOR CHILDREN?
The nasal spray flu vaccine has few side effects, most commonly getting a runny nose after the vaccination for a few days.

Read more about the side effects of the flu vaccine for children.

Talk to the GP, practice nurse or your child's school nurse if you want more information about when and how your child will be vaccinated against flu.

HOW TO GET THE FLU VACCINE FOR YOUR CHILD
Your child's GP or school should contact you about getting them vaccinated.

Talk to the GP, practice nurse or your child's school nurse if you want more information about when and how your child will be vaccinated against flu.

HOW IS THE NASAL SPRAY GIVEN?
The vaccine is given as a single spray squirted up each nostril.

Not only is it needle-free, a big advantage for children, the nasal spray is quick, painless and works even better than the injected flu vaccine.

The vaccine is absorbed very quickly. It will still work even if, after the vaccination, your child develops a runny nose, sneezes or blows their nose.

Read the patient information leaflet for the nasal spray flu vaccine.

ARE THERE ANY CHILDREN WHO SHOULD DELAY HAVING THE NASAL SPRAY FLU VACCINE?
Children should have their nasal spray flu vaccination delayed if they're unwell with a high temperature.

The vaccination can be delayed until they feel better.

If a child has a heavily blocked or runny nose, it might stop the vaccine getting into their system.

In this case, their flu vaccination can be postponed until their nasal symptoms have cleared up.

ARE THERE ANY CHILDREN WHO SHOULD NOT HAVE THE NASAL SPRAY FLU VACCINE?
There are a few children who should avoid the nasal spray flu vaccine.

The vaccine is not recommended for children who have:
  • A severely weakened immune system
  • Severe egg allergy with anaphylaxis that's led to intensive care hospital admission
  • Severe asthma – that is, those being treated with steroid tablets or high-dose inhaled steroids
  • Have been feeling wheezy or hav e been wheezy in the past 72 hours
  • An allergy to any of the vaccine ingredients, such as neomycin
  • A condition that requires salicylate treatment

If your child is at high risk of flu as a result of 1 or more medical conditions or treatments and cannot have the nasal flu vaccine because of this, they should have the injected flu vaccine.

If you're not sure, check with the school immunisation team, the nurse or GP at your surgery, or a specialist.

WHY ARE CHILDREN OFFERED THE FLU VACCINE?
Flu is a very common infection in babies and children. It can be very unpleasant for them.

Children with flu have the same symptoms as adults – including fever, chills, aching muscles, headache, stuffy nose, dry cough and a sore throat lasting up to a week.

Some children develop a very high fever or complications of flu, such as bronchitis, pneumonia and a painful middle ear infection.

They may need hospital treatment, and very occasionally a child may die from flu.

In fact, healthy children under the age of five are more likely to have to be admitted to hospital with flu than any other age group.

For children with long-term health conditions such as diabetes, asthma, heart disease or lung disease, getting flu can be very serious as they are more at risk of developing serious complications;

Find out more in the leaflet Protecting your child against flu.

HOW SAFE IS THE FLU VACCINATION FOR CHILDREN?
The flu vaccine for children has a good safety record. In the UK, millions of children have been vaccinated safely and successfully.

HOW DOES THE FLU VACCINATION WORK?
The vaccine contains live but weakened flu viruses that do not cause flu in children.

It will help your child build up immunity to flu in a similar way as natural infection, but without the symptoms.

Because the main flu viruses change each year, a new nasal spray vaccine has to be given each year, in the same way as the injectable flu vaccine.

STOPPING THE SPREADING OF FLU
TMost children only need a single dose of the nasal spray.

The patient information leaflet provided with the nasal spray suggests children should be given 2 doses of this vaccine if they have not had the flu vaccine before.

But the NHS vaccination programme has advised that healthy children only need a single dose because a second dose of the vaccine provides little additional protection.

Children aged 2 to 9 years at risk of flu because of an underlying medical condition, who have not received flu vaccine before, should have 2 doses of the nasal spray given at least 4 weeks apart.

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Monday 8th July 2019, next review date due: Friday 8th July 2022

ROTAVIRUS
An oral vaccine against rotavirus infection is given to babies as part of their routine childhood vaccinations. The vaccine is given as 2 doses, 4 weeks apart. Usually the first dose is given at 8 weeks, and the second dose at 12 weeks.

The vaccine is given as a liquid straight into the baby's mouth for them to swallow.

Find out more about NHS vaccinations and when to have them.

WHAT IS ROTAVIRUS?
Rotavirus is a highly infectious stomach bug that typically affects babies and young children, causing diarrhoea and vomiting, tummy ache and fever.

Most children recover at home within a few days to a week. But sometimes a child may need to see a doctor. Occasionally treatment in hospital is needed for complications, such as extreme dehydration.

Since its introduction into the vaccination programme, the rotavirus vaccine has significantly reduced the number of children who have diarrohoea and vomiting, and severe rotavirus infections.

WHICH BABIES CAN HAVE THE ROTAVIRUS VACCINATION?
Rotavirus vaccination is available routinely on the NHS as part of the childhood vaccination programme for babies aged 8 weeks and 12 weeks.

Read more about which babies can have the rotavirus vaccination.

The brand name of the rotavirus vaccine used in the UK is Rotarix.

Read the patient information leaflet (PIL) for Rotarix.

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

Face masks and coverings are to be worn at all times by all GP's, nurses, visitors and patients.

FACE MASKS AND COVERINGS EXCEPTIONS - IF YOU ARE MEDICALLY EXEMPT FROM WEARING A MASK OR FACE COVERING

  1. Exception from face covering badges (for a mobile phone)
  2. Exception from face covering badges (to print)
  3. Exception from face covering card (to print)

Some people may feel more comfortable showing something that says they do not have to wear a face covering. This could be in the form of an exemption card, badge or even a home-made sign.

HOW DOES THE ROTAVIRUS VACCINE WORK?
The vaccine contains a weakened strain of rotavirus. This helps your baby to build up immunity, so that the next time they come into contact with rotavirus they will not get the disease.

HOW EFFECTIVE IS THE ROTAVIRUS VACCINE?
The rotavirus vaccine is very effective and gives good immunity to rotavirus infection. Since the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine, it has had a significant impact on the number of cases of rotavirus.

The vaccine is given routinely to children in the US and many other countries around the world in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

HOW ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF THE ROTAVIRUS VACCINE?
The vast majority of babies will not have any problems at all after having their rotavirus vaccination. Some babies who have the vaccine may become restless and irritable, and some may develop mild diarrhoea in the days following vaccination.

It is possible for a baby to get rotavirus infection after being vaccinated. But this is uncommon and the illness is usually milder than it would have been if they had not been vaccinated.

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Thursday 16th April 2020, next review date due: Monday 16th April 2023
MENB
WHAT IS THE MENB VACCINATION??
The MenB vaccine is recommended for babies aged 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 1 year as part of the NHS routine childhood vaccination programme.

The MenB vaccine will protect your baby against infection by meningococcal group B bacteria, which are responsible for more than 90% of meningococcal infections in young children.

Meningococcal infections can be very serious, causing meningitis and sepsis (blood poisoning), which can lead to severe brain damage, amputations and, in some cases, death.

The MenB vaccine used is called Bexsero. It's given as a single injection into your baby's thigh.

England was the first country in the world to offer a national, routine, publicly funded MenB vaccination programme using the Bexsero vaccine

WHEN SHOULD BABIES HAVE THE MENB VACCINE?
The MenB vaccine is offered to babies alongside their other routine vaccinations at;

  • 8 weeks
  • 16 weeks
  • 1 year

HOW TO GET THE MENB VACCINE
Your GP surgery or clinic will send you an appointment for your baby to have their MenB vaccination along with their other routine vaccinations.

Most surgeries and health centres run special immunisation or baby clinics. If you cannot get to the clinic, contact the surgery to make another appointment.

Find out when your baby should have the MenB vaccine.

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

Face masks and coverings are to be worn at all times by all GP's, nurses, visitors and patients.

FACE MASKS AND COVERINGS EXCEPTIONS - IF YOU ARE MEDICALLY EXEMPT FROM WEARING A MASK OR FACE COVERING

  1. Exception from face covering badges (for a mobile phone)
  2. Exception from face covering badges (to print)
  3. Exception from face covering card (to print)

Some people may feel more comfortable showing something that says they do not have to wear a face covering. This could be in the form of an exemption card, badge or even a home-made sign.

MENB VACCINE SAFETY
Like all vaccines, the MenB vaccine can cause side effects, but studies suggest they are generally mild and do not last long.

Almost 8,000 people, including more than 5,000 babies and toddlers, have had the MenB vaccine during clinical trials to test its safety.

Since the vaccine was licensed, almost 2 million doses have been given, with no safety concerns identified.

Read the patient information leaflet for Bexsero

CAN THE MENB VACCINE BE GIVEN AT THE SAME TIME AS OTHER VACCINES?
The MenB vaccine can be given at the same time as other routine baby vaccinations, such as the 6-in-1 vaccine and pneumococcal vaccine.

Can vaccines overload a baby's immune system?

MENB VACCINE AND FEVER
Babies given the MenB vaccine alongside their other routine vaccinations at 8 and 16 weeks are likely to develop a high temperature (fever) within 24 hours of vaccination.

It's important to give your baby liquid paracetamol following vaccination to reduce the risk of fever. Your nurse will give you more information about paracetamol at your vaccination appointment.

Other common side effects include irritability, and redness and tenderness at the injection site. The liquid paracetamol will also help with these symptoms.

Read this NHS leaflet about how to use paracetamol to prevent and treat fever after MenB vaccination.

MENINGITIS IS A KILLER
Meningococcal group B bacteria are a serious cause of life-threatening infections worldwide, including meningitis and blood poisoning, and the leading infectious killer of babies and young children in the UK.

There are 12 known groups of meningococcal bacteria, and group B (MenB) is responsible for about 90% of meningococcal infections in the UK.

Meningitis and sepsis caused by meningococcal group B bacteria can affect people of any age but are most common in babies and young children.

Meningococcal infections tend to come in bursts. In the past 20 years, between 500 and 1,700 people every year, mainly babies and young children, have developed MenB disease, with around 1 in 10 dying from the infection.

Many of those who survive have a permanent disability, such as an amputation, brain damage or epilepsy.

Read more about meningitis.

MENB VACCINE PROTECTION
There are hundreds of different strains of meningococcal group B bacteria around the world, and some tests predict that the Bexsero MenB vaccine protects against almost 90% of the ones circulating in England.

However, it is not yet clear how this will relate to lives saved or cases prevented.

HOW THE MENB VACCINE WORKS
The MenB vaccine is made from 3 major proteins found on the surface of most meningococcal bacteria, combined with the outer membrane of 1 MenB strain. Together, they stimulate the immune system to protect against future exposures to meningococcal bacteria.

For more detail on the ingredients of the MenB vaccine, read the patient information leaflet for Bexsero

DIFFERENT TYPES OF MENINGITIS VACCINES
YThere are 2 other vaccines against common strains of meningococcal disease:

  • The MenACWY vaccine against meningococcal groups A, C, W and Y – offered on the NHS to 14-year-olds and first-time students
  • The Hib/MenC vaccine against haemophilus influenza type B and meningococcal group C – for babies at 1 year old
RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Tuesday 11th June 2018, next review date due: Friday 11th June 2021
NURSE CLINICS
Our nurses provide the following to our patient's
  • Postnatal checks
  • Maternity bookings
  • New patient health checks
  • Wound dressings
  • The removal of sutures
  • Blood pressure checks
  • I.M/Subcut immunisations
  • Blood sugar monitoring and checks
  • NHS health checks
  • Pill checks
  • Shingles immunisations
  • Flu immunisations
  • Childhood Vaccinations
  • Cervical screening

 

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment.

Prior to the appointment all patients are required to have their temperatures checked and to ask the receptionist for a token which they can use on our blood pressure machine, the machine will check your Blood pressure, height and weight. You will get a printout of your results which can then be passed onto the receptionist where it can be added to your health records.

On-entry to the Health centre you will be asked by the health centre security guard to make sure that you are wearing face masks or face coverings, he will ask if you are exempt, and will ask you to santatise your hands. The service is provided by Prototech Security.

Face masks and coverings are to be worn at all times by all GP's, nurses, visitors and patients.

FACE MASKS AND COVERINGS EXCEPTIONS - IF YOU ARE MEDICALLY EXEMPT FROM WEARING A MASK OR FACE COVERING

  1. Exception from face covering badges (for a mobile phone)
  2. Exception from face covering badges (to print)
  3. Exception from face covering card (to print)

Some people may feel more comfortable showing something that says they do not have to wear a face covering. This could be in the form of an exemption card, badge or even a home-made sign.

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021

IF YOUR DEPRESSED, STRESSED OR ANXIOUS

WE CAN HELP!!!

HOW CAN WE HELP?
We offer both individual and group therapies, such as;

  • Cognitive behavioural therapy
  • Interpersonal psychotherapy
  • Couples therapy for depression
  • Behavioural couple's therapy

ABOUT US
Waltham Forest Talking Therapies IAPT is a service open to residents of Waltham Forest for those 18 years and over and whom are registered with a Waltham Forest GP. The service is available across the borough, including GP practices and community venues.

INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS WITH A NELFT APPOINTMENT DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEDMIC
If you are feeling well and healthy, with no symptoms of coronavirus you should attend your appointment as normal. The symptoms start with a fever (high temperature) followed by a dry cough that can lead to breathing difficulties. Please note your service will be considering different ways to manage your appointment including video conferencing and will let you know the details you need.

If you are displaying any symptoms of coronavirus (a new continuous cough or high temperature of 37.8 degrees centigrade or above) you should self-isolate for a period of 14 days. Please do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy, community clinic or hospital. You should not attend your appointment with us, but please do get in touch with your service to let us know you will not be attending.

If you have been swabbed for coronavirus and you are awaiting your results, please do not attend your appointment. Please phone your service to inform us that you will not be attending.

Patient's who feel that they may have Coronavirus or may have come into contact with someone who has, the NHS 111 has created Coronavirus pages to inform patient's on what to do based on the above.

These can be accessed at https://111.nhs.uk/service/covid-19

 

Everyone is being reminded to follow Public Health England advice to:

  • Always carry tissues with you and use them to catch your cough or sneeze. Then bin the tissue, and wash your hands, or use a sanitiser gel.
  • Wash your hands often with liquid soap and water, especially after using public transport. Use a sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are unwell.

Read about video consultations here.

TAKE YOUR FIRST STEP
Call us on: 0300 300 1554

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021

BLOOD TESTING CLINICS
North East London NHS Foundation Trust has taken over the delivery of the Community and Domicillary Phlebotomy Service.

In order to deliver an improved service with more appointments available overall, blood testing services are available from:

  • Silverthorne Medical Centre, 2 Friars Close, E4 6UN, from 8.15am to 12.30pm and from 1.15pm to 4.00pm Monday to Friday
  • St James Health Practice, 47 St James St, Walthamstow, London E17 7NH, from 8.15am to 12.30pm Monday to Friday, with an afternoon clinic from 1.15pm to 5.30pm Monday to Friday
  • Langthorne Health Centre, 13 Langthorne Rd, London, E11 4HX, from 8.15am to 5.30pm Mondays Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and from 8.15am - 12.30pm on Thursdays

ONLINE BOOKINGS NOW AVAILABLE
Our patients can book or cancel blood test appointments online;

If patients are unable to book their own appointment, a relative or carer can register to book on their behalf.

Please note appointments cannot be pre-booked by telephone.

If you have been referred by your GP, book your blood test appointments online at;

https://www.swiftqueue.co.uk/pre_timescreen.php?id=10315

CRITERIA FOR HOME VISITS
Domiciliary phlebotomy will be provided to those who are confined to their homes due to illness, in care homes (with no nursing facilities) and or disability or learning disability with challenging behaviour and/non-urgent patient transport service to attend hospital appointments.

DOMICILARY PHLEBOTOMY
Referrals to the domiciliary phlebotomy service will be made via secure mail on the WF Adult SPA referral form to the WF Adult Single point of Access (SPA). Domiciliary referrals will be responded to within 2 days. Where the referral is urgent the phlebotomist shall attend to the patient within 4 days and for routine referrals within 2-3 weeks.

 

BLOOD TESTS FOR CHILDREN AGED 10 AND ABOVE
Please use the adult clinics listed above, with the support of a parent or a guardian

BLOOD TESTS FOR CHILDREN AGED 9 AND UNDER
Please visit the outpatient's at Whipps Cross Hospital Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9.30am - 3.30pm

CONTACT OUR SERVICE IN WALTHAM FOREST
The service will be provided to all patients who present a blood test request form.

Core Opening Hours: 8.00am – 5.30pm
Email: nem-tr.wfadultchsreferrals@nhs.net
Telephone Number:
030 0300 1710

Click here to download a referral form

For test results, please contact the practice between 2.30PM and 4.30PM

Please allow a minimum of 1 week for test results to be available.

Note that the practice has a strict policy regarding confidentiality and data protection and we will only release test results to the person to whom they relate unless that person has given prior permission for the release of this data or they are not capable of understanding the results.

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021
HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
Blood pressure, or hypertension, rarely has noticeable symptoms. But if untreated, it increases your risk of serious problems such as heart attacks and strokes.

More than one in four adults in the UK have high blood pressure, although many won't realise it.

The only way to find out if your blood pressure is high is to have your blood pressure checked. 

WHAT IS BLOOD PRESSURE?
Blood pressure is recorded with two numbers. The systolic pressure (higher number) is the force at which your heart pumps blood around your body.

The diastolic pressure (lower number) is the resistance to the blood flow in the blood vessels. They're both measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg).

As a general guide;

  • High blood pressure is considered to be 140/90mmHg or higher
  • Ideal blood pressure is considered to be between 90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg
  • Low blood pressure is considered to be 90/60mmHg or lower

A blood pressure reading between 120/80mmHg and 140/90mmHg could mean you're at risk of developing high blood pressure if you don't take steps to keep your blood pressure under control.

RISKS OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
If your blood pressure is too high, it puts extra strain on your blood vessels, heart and other organs, such as the brain, kidneys and eyes.

Persistent high blood pressure can increase your risk of a number of serious and potentially life-threatening conditions, such as;

  • Heart disease
  • Heart attacks
  • Strokes
  • Heart failure
  • Peripheral arterial disease
  • Aortic aneurysms
  • kydney disease
  • Vascular dementia

If you have high blood pressure, reducing it even a small amount can help lower your risk of these conditions

CHECK YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE
The only way of knowing whether you have high blood pressure is to have a blood pressure test.
All adults over 40 are advised to have their blood pressure checked at least every five years. Getting this done is easy and could save your life.

You can get your blood pressure tested at a number of places, including;

  • At your GP surgery
  • At some pharmacies
  • As part of your NHS Health Check
  • In some workplaces
  • A Home blood pressure monitor

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

CAUSES OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
It's not always clear what causes high blood pressure, but certain things can increase your risk.

You're at an increased risk of high blood pressure if you;

  • Are over the age of 65
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Are of African or Caribbean descent
  • Have a relative with high blood pressure
  • Eat too much salt and don't eat enough fruit and vegetables
  • Don't do enough exercise
  • Drink too much alcohol or coffee (or other caffeine-based drinks)
  • Smoke
  • Don't get much sleep or have disturbed sleep

Making healthy lifestyle changes can help reduce your chances of getting high blood pressure and help lower your blood pressure if it's already high.

REDUCE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE
The following lifestyle changes can help prevent and lower high blood pressure;

  • Reduce the amount of salt you eat and have a generally healthy diet
  • Cut back on alcohol if you drink too much
  • Lose weight if you're overweight
  • Exercise regularly
  • Cut down on caffeine
  • Stop smoking
  • Try to get at least six hours of sleep a night

Some people with high blood pressure may also need to take one or more medicines to stop their blood pressure getting too high.

MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
If you're diagnosed with high blood pressure, your doctor may recommend taking one or more medicines to keep it under control.
These usually need to be taken once a day.

Common blood pressure medications include;

  • ACE inhibitors – such as enalapril, lisinopril, perindopril and ramipril
  • Angiotensin-2 receptor blockers (ARBs) – such as candesartan, irbesartan, losartan, valsartan and olmesartan
  • Calcium channel blockers – such as amlodipine, felodipine and nifedipine or diltiazem and verapamil.
  • Diuretics – such as indapamide and bendroflumethiazide
  • Beta-blockers – such as atenolol and bisoprolol Alpha-blockers – such as doxazosin
  • Renin inhibitors – such as aliskiren
  • Other diuretics – such as amiloride and spironolactone

The medication recommended for you will depend on things like how high your blood pressure is and your age.

For test results, please contact the practice between 2.30PM and 4.30PM

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021
FAMILY PLANNING AND SEXUAL HEALTH
A full range of contraceptive services including the pill and injections are available, please make an appointment with the doctor. We offer screening for Chlamydia for patients aged between 16 and 24, both male and female.

CHLAMYDIA TESTING
Chlamydia is the most commonly diagnosed STI in England today and the rates are increasing. The test is offered to everyone between 15 and 25 years of age.

For most people, Chlamydia has no symptoms, so you don't know if you or your partner has it without taking a test. If you are sexually active and under 25 years of age, you should be tested for Chlamydia every year, or when you change your partner.

Untreated Chlamydia can have serious long-term health implications and you may not be able to have children in the future.

Any form of unprotected sex can put you at risk.

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

Face masks and coverings are to be worn at all times by all GP's, nurses, visitors and patients.

FACE MASKS AND COVERINGS EXCEPTIONS - IF YOU ARE MEDICALLY EXEMPT FROM WEARING A MASK OR FACE COVERING

  1. Exception from face covering badges (for a mobile phone)
  2. Exception from face covering badges (to print)
  3. Exception from face covering card (to print)

Some people may feel more comfortable showing something that says they do not have to wear a face covering. This could be in the form of an exemption card, badge or even a home-made sign.

For test results, please contact the practice between 2.30PM and 4.30PM

Please note that not all immunsations are available on the NHS and you may have to pay

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021
MEASLES

*IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT*

There have been serious outbreaks in England and Wales and the number of children catching measles is rising. Measles can be a very serious disease, leading to ear and chest infections, fits, diarrhoea, and damage to the brain.

Measles is very deadly and could cause death.

Your child is at risk of measles if he or she has not had the MMR vaccination.

  • 2 doses of the MMR vaccine are needed to ge the best protection
  • If your child is due to have had the 2 doses of MMR, but has not received them, no matter what age they are, you should book an appointment with 1 of our nurses as soon as possible
  • If you can't remember if your child has had 1 or 2 doses of the MMR vaccine, check his or her personal health check record (the Red Book). If this does not help contact one of our receptionists who can advise you more and book an appointment with 1 of our nurses
  • If you don't know how many doses your child has had, it's better to have 2 doses of the MMR vaccine now rather them being unprotected
  • In response to the local outbreak, then the 2 doses can be given a month apart from the age of 18 months

For more infiormation about Measles and the MMR Vaccine, please visit,

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Measles/

ANSWERS TO COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT MEASLES AND THE MMR VACCINE

WHY ARE WE SEEING THESE OUTBRAKES OF THE MEASLES
Measles is highly infectious disease, spreading quickly from person to person, especially in schools. A child with measles can infect almost all unprotected children they have contact with.

Since the end of 2017 there has been an increase in the measles globally which has affected the UK.

This has resulted in some spread into wider communities, in particular undervaccinated groups.

 

WHEN ARE THE MMR VACCINATIONS USUALLY GIVEN?
The best times are between 12 and 13 months of age and again at 3 and 4 months, with one does per visit. But if your child wasn't vaccinated then they can be vaccinated at any age with 2 doses one month apart.

WILL THERE BE ANY SIDE EFFECTS TO THE VACCINATION?
Your child may get the symptoms of Measles, Mumps and Rubella for up to 6 weeks after the vaccination, but in a very much milder form.

This proves that the vaccine is working and that your child is buidling up resistance to future contact with the viruses that cause these diseases. Not al children show these symptoms but that does not mean that the vacciine is is not working.

 
MEASLE'S INFORMATION LEAFLETS AUGUST 2019
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SHOULD PARENTS IN OUTBREAK AREAS GET VACCINATED AGAINST MEASLES?
As with many diseases, once you have had Measles, you don't catch it again because you have built up a resistance to it. So if you've had measles, and had the 2 doses of the MMR vaccine, you do not need to get vaccinated now.

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021

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L.L. Medical Care Ltd (Agarwal And Agrawal Practice), Langthorne Health Centre, 13 Langthorne Road, Leytonstone, London, E11 4HX