~ CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) ~
Click here or more health information and advice, read our pages on Coronavirus - Click here for more information about the government guidelines - Click here for more information on the details of the Coronavirus exit roadmap - Click here for more information about how Coronavirus vaccinations are being delivered in Waltham Forest and the rest of London
NEW PATIENTS:
 
NEWSLETTERS:
 
CORONAVIRUS:
 
 
CORONAVIRUS
Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) a new illness that affects your lungs and airways.

Do not go to places like a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital if you think you might have Coronavirus. Stay at home.

USE THE 111 ONLINE CORONAVIRUS SERVICE IF YOU HAVE EITHER;
  • A high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)
  • A new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual)

These are the main symptoms of Coronavirus.

The 111 online Coronavirus service will ask about your symptoms and tell you what to do.

USE THE NHS ONLINE CORONAVIRUS SERVICE - ONLY CALL IF YOU CANNOT GET HELP 0NLINE
 
BABIES AND CHILDREN

Call 111 if you're worried about a baby or child.

If they seem very unwell, are getting worse, or you think there's something seriously wrong, call 999.

Do not delay getting help if you're worried. Trust your instincts.

GET MORE ADVICE ABOUT CORONAVIRUS IN CHILDREN
For more help and advice;
 
WHEN AND WHY YOU ARE ALLOWED OUT
For more information about the government guidelines click here

IF YOU BREAK THE RULES
The police can take action against you if you meet in larger groups. This includes breaking up illegal gatherings and issuing fines (fixed penalty notices).

You can be given a Fixed Penalty Notice of £200 for the first offence, doubling for further offences up to a maximum of £6,400. If you hold, or are involved in holding, an illegal gathering of over 30 people, the police can issue fines of £10,000.

PEOPLE AT HIGH RISK FROM CORONAVIRUS
People at high risk from Coronavirus include people who;

  • Have had an organ transplant
  • Are having chemotherapy or antibody treatment for cancer, including immunotherapy
  • Are having an intense course of radiotherapy (radical radiotherapy) for lung cancer
  • Are having targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system (such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors)
  • Have blood or bone marrow cancer (such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma)
  • Have had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant in the past 6 months, or are still taking immunosuppressant medicine
  • Have been told by a doctor they you have a severe lung condition (such as cystic fibrosis, severe asthma or severe COPD)
  • Have a condition that means they have a very high risk of getting infections (such as SCID or sickle cell)
  • Are taking medicine that makes them much more likely to get infections (such as high doses of steroids)
  • Were born with a serious heart condition and are pregnant
  • Are pregnant

If you're at high risk from Coronavirus, you should have received a letter from the NHS.

Speak to your GP or hospital care team if you have not been contacted and think you should have been.

PEOPLE AT MODERATE RISK (CLINICALLY VULNERABLE)
People at moderate risk from Coronavirus include people who;

  • Are 70 or older
  • Are pregnant
  • Have a lung condition that's not severe (such as asthma, COPD, emphysema or bronchitis)
  • Have heart disease (such as heart failure)
  • Have diabetes
  • Have chronic kidney disease
  • Have liver disease (such as hepatitis)
  • Have a condition affecting the brain or nerves (such as Parkinson's disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy)
  • Have a condition that means they have a high risk of getting infections
  • Are taking medicine that can affect the immune system (such as low doses of steroids)
  • Are very obese (a BMI of 40 or above)

IF YOU ARE SHIELDING (CLINICALLY VULNERABLE)

  • You do not need to try to stay 2 metres away from people you live with
  • You can meet with 1 other household if you live alone or you’re a single parent who lives alone with your children – this is called a support bubble
  • You can meet outside with people you do not live with, in groups of up to 6 – as long as you stay 2 metres away from each other

OTHER AREAS THAT CAN AFFECT YOUR RISK

  • Your age - you risk increases with age
  • Being a man
  • Where in the country that you live, the risk is higher in poor areas
  • Being from a Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic (BAME) background
  • Being born outside of the UK or Ireland
  • Living in a care home
  • Having certain jobs, such as a nurse, taxi driver and security guard

PREGNANCY ADVICE

HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF AT HOME WHILE SELF ISOLATING, OR YOU ARE LIVING WITH SOMEONE WHO IS SELF-ISOLATING
If you're at high risk from coronavirus, you're advised to take extra steps to protect yourself.

This includes not leaving your home for any reason (called shielding).

If it's not possible to avoid close contact with someone who's at high risk, you could choose to stay at home all the time.

This will help reduce the risk of you and the person you live with becoming ill.

If you choose to stay at home all the time, you can get food and medicine delivered and left outside your door. Ask friends and family to help or register for Coronavirus support on GOV.UK if you need it

If your symptoms are mild, you'll usually be advised to not leave your home for at least 7 days.

Anyone you live with should not leave your home for 14 days.

This is called self-isolation.

It is currently recommended that you follow the following advice;
GENERAL HEALTH
Wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
Always wash your hands when you get home from work
Use hand sanatiser, if soap and water are not available
Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing
Put tissues in the bin straight away and wash your hands afterwards
Prepare a hospital bag, including a list of the medicines you're taking, in case you need to go into hospital
Stay at home at all times – do not leave your home to buy food, collect medicine or exercise
Get food and medicine delivered and left outside your door – ask friends and family to help or register to get coronavirus support on GOV.UK if you need it
Spend as little time as possible in shared rooms, for example, the kitchen and sitting areas
Stay at least 1 metre (3 ft), 1m plus rule in close contact areas, away from other people in your home as much as possible
Use separate towels, including hand towels and tea towels
Make sure anyone who comes into your home washes their hands with soap and water for 20 seconds
Clean objects and surfaces you touch often (such as door handles, kettles and phones) using your regular cleaning products
Clean cutlery, dishes and pans thoroughly
Clean a shared bathroom each time you use it, for example by wiping the surfaces you have touched
DO NOT DO ANY OF THE FOLLOWING
Do not touch your eyes, nose and mouth if your hands are not clean
Do not go to work
Avoid public transport
Do not have visitors in your home, including friends and family, unless they're providing essential care
Do not stop taking any prescription medicines without speaking to your doctor

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021
REGISTER FOR SUPPORT
If you've been told you're at high risk from coronavirus, you can register for support, such as getting food delivered to your home.

It's a good idea to do this even if you do not need support right now.

You can either;

You'll need your NHS number to register. You can find this on the letter you received telling you that you're at high risk, or on any prescriptions.

If you have to stay at home but feel wel enough to work, ask your employer if you can work from home. If you can work from home, you will not need an isolation notice. You can also use this service for someone else.

More information and advice can be found from the following documents that we have prepared;

The practice has prepared documents for self-isolation to provide our patients with advice if they have been diagnosed as postive Coronavirus patient's.

Please select your document from the list below;

CORONAVIRUS SELF-ISOLATION ADVICE
Albanian Arabic Bulgarian Chinese (Cantonese) Chinese (Mandarin) English
French Hindi Italian Lithuanian Portuguese Polish
Romanian Russian Spanish Urdu        

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021
CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19): TRAVEL CORRIDORS
Travel corridors were suspended 4am, 18 January 2021.

If you arrive in England from anywhere outside the UK, Ireland, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man you will need to self-isolate for 10 days.

You must have proof of a negative coronavirus test to travel to England.

Anyone arriving in England from 15 February will need to either:

  • Self-isolate in the place they’re staying for 10 days, or
  • Quarantine in a government approved hotel for 10 days

What you need to do depends on where you have been in the 10 days before you arrive in England.

You must also get 2 coronavirus tests after you arrive in England - you’ll need to book these before you travel.

Find out more about the new rules.

If you have been in or through any country on the travel ban red list in the previous 10 days, you will be refused entry to the UK.

If you are a British or Irish National, or you have residence rights in the UK, you will be able to enter. You must self-isolate for 10 days on arrival along with your household. You cannot use the Test to Release scheme.

You must have proof of a negative coronavirus (COVID-19) test to travel to England.

You must take a test even if:

  • You’re a UK citizen
  • You’ve already had the COVID-19 vaccine
  • You must take the test in the 3 days before the service on which you will arrive in England departs.

For example, if you travel directly to England on Friday, you must take the test on the Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday.

RED LISTED COUNTRIES AND DESTINATIONS

Angola Eswatini Portugal (including Madeira and The Azores
Argentina French Guiana Rwanda
Boliva Guyana Seychelles
Botswana Lesotho South Africa
Brazil Malawi Suriname
Burundi Mauritius Tanzania
Cape verde Mozambique United Arab Emirates (UAE)
Chile Namibia Uruguay
Colombia Panama Venezuela
Democratic Reupblic of Congo Paraquay Zambia
Ecuador Peru Zimbabwe

HOW TO PROVIDE PROOF OF A NEGATIVE TEST RESULT
Your test result can be provided as:

  • A printed document
  • An email or text message you can show on your phone - make sure your device is charged

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE PROOF OF A NEGATIVE TEST RESULT
If you do not present proof you tested negative, you may not be able to board your transport to England.

If you arrive in England without proof you tested negative, you could be fined £500

WHERE TO TAKE YOUR TEST
You can choose to take a test:

  • In the place where you start your journey
  • In another country on your way to England, if you are travelling through another country

TRAVEL CORRIDOR EXCEPTION RULES
Coronavirus (COVID-19) regulations mean that you must self-isolate for 10 days when you arrive in the UK. This applies to UK residents and visitors to the UK.

You do not have to self-isolate on arrival in England if, during the last 10 days, you have only been somewhere on the travel corridor exempt list, or in the UK.

IF YOU VISIT SOMEWHERE THAT IS NOT EXEMPT
You will need to self-isolate when you arrive in England if you visit somewhere that is not exempt in the 10 days before you arrive. Visiting includes making a transit stop.

You will need to self-isolate for up to 10 days - the exact number of days depends on when you left the non-exempt country, territory or region.

TAKING A TEST ON YOUR JOURNEY TO ENGLAND
If your journey to England is long, and will involve stopping in another country on the way, you should try to take a test in the country you’re travelling through. This is so you take the test in the 3 days before you board the final service to England.

If you’re travelling by plane and changing flights, where possible you should get a test within 3 days of your final departure point to England.

TAKING A TEST ON YOUR JOURNEY TO ENGLAND
If you plan to take a test in a country on your way to England, you must make sure that this is possible before you set out. Some countries have entry restrictions in place, which means you may have to get tested there.

If you do not have proof of a test because you planned to get tested on your journey, but you were not able to do so because you were not able to enter the country in which you planned to get tested, you will be allowed to board. But you may be fined £500 on arrival in England because you do not have a valid test result.

TEST PROVIDEDRS AND TYPE OF TEST
You will need to find a test provider. You must make sure that the test provider can meet the standards for pre-departure testing.

The test must meet performance standards of =97% specificity, =80% sensitivity at viral loads above 100,000 copies/ml.

This could include tests such as:

  • A nucleic acid test, including a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test or derivative technologies, including loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) tests
  • n antigen test, such as a test from a lateral flow device

It’s your responsibility to ensure the test meets the minimum standards for sensitivity, specificity and viral load details. You must check with your test provider that it meets those standards.

You may not be able to travel if the test does not meet these standards. It’s your responsibility to ensure you get the right test that meets the above requirements.

INFORMATION THAT THE TEST RESULT SHOULD INCLUDE
Your test result must be iether in English, French or Spanish. Translations will not be accepted. You must provide the original test result certificate. It must include the following information:

  • Your name, which should match the name on your travel documents
  • Your date of birth or age
  • The result of the test
  • The date the test sample was collected or received by the test provider
  • The name of the test provider and their contact details
  • The name of the test device

If the test result does not include this information you may not be able to board, and may not be able to travel to England. If you arrive without a test result that includes this information, you might have to pay a £500 fine.

EXCEPTIONS - PEOPLE WHO DO NOT NEED TO TAKE A TEST

TRAVEL FROM SOME OTHER COUNTRIES
You do not need to take a test if you began your journey to England from:

  • Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, the Isle of Man, Jersey or Guernsey
  • Ascension, Falkland Islands, St Helena

CHILDREN AND MEDICAL REASONS
Children aged under 11 do not need to take a test.

You do not need to take a test if you are travelling to the UK:

  • For urgent medical treatment or are accompanying someone who is travelling for urgent medical treatment, and it is not reasonably practical for you to obtain a negative COVID-19 test in the 3 days before departure
  • If you have a medical condition which means you cannot take a test – you must present a note from a medical practitioner at check in and to Border Force staff on arrival in England

EXCEMPT JOBS
People doing the following jobs do not need to take a test:

  • Border and customs officials
  • Channel tunnel system workers
  • Hauliers
  • Air, maritime and rail crew
  • Civil aviation inspectors
  • People transporting human cells and blood products
  • Seamen and masters and inspectors and surveyors of ships
  • Specialist technical workers - goods and services

ARRIVAL IN THE UK - PASSENGER LOCATOR FORM
You must show proof of a completed passenger locator form at the UK border.

  • This applies to people entering the UK from all countries, territories and regions.
  • It applies to UK residents and visitors.

You should complete the form before you enter the UK.

You can complete it any time in the 48 hour period before you are due to arrive in the UK.

Make sure you leave yourself enough time to complete it. If you do not complete the form before you arrive in the UK, it might take you longer to enter the UK.

The form is an online form. You will need an internet connection and details of your journey to complete it.

Failure to complete the form is a criminal offence.

TEST TO RELEASE SCHEME
You can shorten your self-isolation period if you pay for a COVID-19 test after isolating for 5 days. This is known as the Test to Release for International Travel scheme.

The scheme is not available to anyone who has been in or through any country that is subject to a travel ban in the 10 days before arrival in England.

Tell a member of the staff or crew if you develop symptoms while travelling.

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021

WHAT IS A FACE COVERING?
In the context of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, a face covering is something which safely covers the nose and mouth. You can buy reusable or single-use face coverings. You may also use a scarf, bandana, religious garment or hand-made cloth covering but these must securely fit round the side of the face.

Face coverings are instead largely intended to protect others, not the wearer, against the spread of infection because they cover the nose and mouth, which are the main confirmed sources of transmission of virus that causes coronavirus infection (COVID-19).

A face visor or shield may be worn in addition to a face covering but not instead of one. This is because face visors or shields do not adequately cover the nose and mouth.

WHERE TO WEAR A FACE COVERING?
There are some places where you must wear a face covering by law, unless you are exempt or have a reasonable excuse. In England you must wear a face covering in the following indoor settings;

  • Public transport (aeroplanes, trains, trams and buses)
  • Taxis and private hire vehicles
  • Shops and supermarkets (places which offer goods or services for retail sale or hire)
  • Shopping centres (malls and indoor markets)
  • Premises providing hospitality (bars, pubs, restaurants, cafes), except when seated at a table to eat or drink
  • Post offices, banks, building societies, high-street solicitors and accountants, credit unions, short-term loan providers, savings clubs and money service businesses
  • Libraries and public reading rooms
  • Places of worship
  • Public areas in hotels and hostels
  • Storage and distribution facilities
 
COVID-19 MASK EXCEPTIONS LETTER REQUESTS

Unfortunately, as a practice we are unable to offer exception letter for patients for face mask exceptions.

This includes sick notes and exception letters. Following the latest government guidance, there is no requirement for evidence of exception.

It should be sufficient for someone to declare that they are eligible for an exception directly with the person questionning them, such as a bus driver or shop assistant.

As a result, our practice is therefore not required to provide letters of support for those who fall under the list of exceptions or those who do not fall under the list of exceptions.

Some transport providers are providing evidence of exceptions themselves, such as First Bus and Arriva.

FOR MORE GUIDANCE PLEASE VISIT

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/face-coverings-when-to-wear-one-and-how-to-make-your-own

THE USE OF MASKS HAS BEEN OUT IN PLACE TO NOT ONLY PROTECT YOU, BUT THE STAFF WORKING IN ALL AREAS

 

 

You are expected to wear a face covering before entering any of these settings and must keep it on until you leave unless there is a reasonable excuse for removing it.

You should also wear a face covering in indoor places not listed here where social distancing may be difficult and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet.

Face coverings are needed in NHS settings, including hospitals and primary or community care settings, such as GP surgeries. They are also advised to be worn in care homes.

ENFORCEMENT MEASURES FOR FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH THIS LAW
Premises where face coverings are required should take reasonable steps to promote compliance with the law.

The police can take measures if members of the public do not comply with this law without a valid exemption and transport operators can deny access to their public transport services if a passenger is not wearing a face covering, or direct them to wear one or leave a service.

If necessary the police and Transport for London (TfL) officers have enforcement powers, including issuing fines of £200 (reduced to £100 if paid within 14 days) for the first offence.

Repeat offenders receiving fines on public transport or in an indoor setting will have their fines doubled at each offence.

After the first offence there will be no discount. For example, receiving a second fine will amount to £400 and a third fine will be £800, up to a maximum value of £6,400.

WHEN YOU DO NOT NEED TO WEAR A FACE COVERING
Premises In settings where face coverings are required in England there are some circumstances where people may not be able to wear a face covering.

Please be mindful and respectful of such circumstances. Some people are less able to wear face coverings, and the reasons for this may not be visible to others.

This includes (but is not limited to):

  • Children under the age of 11 (Public Health England does not recommend face coverings for children under the age of 3 for health and safety reasons)
  • People who cannot put on, wear or remove a face covering because of a physical or mental illness or impairment, or disability
    where putting on, wearing or removing a face covering will cause you severe distress
  • If you are speaking to or providing assistance to someone who relies on lip reading, clear sound or facial expressions to communicate
  • To avoid harm or injury, or the risk of harm or injury, to yourself or others ? including if it would negatively impact on your ability to exercise or participate in a strenuous activity
  • Police officers and other emergency workers, given that this may interfere with their ability to serve the public

There are also scenarios when you are permitted to remove a face covering:

  • If asked to do so in a bank, building society, or post office for identification
  • If asked to do so by shop staff or relevant employees for identification, for assessing health recommendations (for example by a pharmacist) or for age identification purposes, including when buying age restricted products such as alcohol
  • If required in order to receive treatment or services, for example when getting a facial
  • In order to take medication
  • If you are delivering a sermon or prayer in a place of worship
  • If you are the persons getting married in a relevant place
  • If you are aged 11 to 18 attending a faith school and having lessons in a place of worship as part of your core curriculum
  • If you are undertaking exercise or an activity and it would negatively impact your ability to do so
  • If you are an elite sports person, professional dancer or referee acting in the course of your employment
    when seated to eat or drink in a hospitality premise such as a pub, bar, restaurant or cafe. You must put a face covering back on once you finish eating or drinking

WHEN YOU DO NOT NEED TO WEAR A FACE COVERING
If you have an age, health or disability reason for not wearing a face covering:

  • You do not routinely need to show any written evidence of this
  • You do not need show an exemption card
  • This means that you do not need to seek advice or request a letter from a medical professional about your reason for not wearing a face covering.

However, some people may feel more comfortable showing something that says they do not have to wear a face covering. This could be in the form of an exemption card, badge or even a home-made sign.

Carrying an exemption card or badge is a personal choice and is not required by law.

  1. Exception from face covering badges (for a mobile phone)
  2. Exception from face covering badges (to print)
  3. Exception from face covering card (to print)

Some people may feel more comfortable showing something that says they do not have to wear a face covering. This could be in the form of an exemption card, badge or even a home-made sign.

This is a personal choice, and is not necessary in law.

If you would like to use an exemption card you can use the PDF attachments on this page.

Those who have an age, health or disability reason to not wear a face covering should not be routinely asked to provide any written evidence of this. Written evidence includes exemption cards.

DO'S AND DONT'S ABOUT WEARING MASKS AND COVERINGS
Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water for 20 seconds or use hand sanitiser before putting a face covering on
Change the face covering if it becomes damp or if you’ve touched it
Avoid wearing on your neck or forehead
Avoid touching the part of the face covering in contact with your mouth and nose, as it could be contaminated with the virus
Avoid taking it off and putting it back on a lot in quick succession (for example, when leaving and entering shops on a high street)
WHEN REMOVING FACE MASKS AND COVERINGS
Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water for 20 seconds or use hand sanitiser before putting a face covering on
Only handle the straps, ties or clips
If single-use, dispose of it carefully in a residual waste bin and do not recycle
If reusable, wash it in line with manufacturer’s instructions at the highest temperature appropriate for the fabric
Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water for 20 seconds or use hand sanitiser once removed
Do not give it to someone else to use

Please see the links below for more information;

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021

TESTING AND TRACING
There are 2 different coronavirus tests. One tells you if you have coronavirus now, the other tells you if you’ve had it before.

Anyone with coronavirus symptoms can get a test. Coronavirus symptoms are;

  • A high temperature
  • A new, continuous cough
  • A loss or change to your sense of smell or taste

Get a free NHS test to check if you have coronavirus.

Order a home testing kit

Instructions for using a home testing kit

You will be told the right place to be tested by NHS 111

AT THE HOSPITAL                

STEP 1
Follow the signs to the Coronavirus isolation pod

STEP 2
Inside the pod call NHS 111

STEP 3
A nurse wearing protective clothing will appear
STEP 4
Swabs will be taken for testing
STEP 5
Self-isolate at home or elsewhere
DRIVE THROUGH FACILITY HOME VISIT

You will be tested without leaving your car

NHS staff will visit your home

CORONAVIRUS TEST CENTRE LOCATIONS NEAREST TO THE LANGTHORNE MEDICAL CENTRE
Covid-19 cases are very high and are on the rise across every area of Waltham Forest. Testing capacity in Waltham Forest has been increased in Watham Forest to make it easier for residents to get tested. Mobile Testing Units have been set up at various locations and we have recently introduced the Jubilee Centre.

These sites are part of the community testing programme and offer a Lateral Flow Test (LFT) which allows people who have no symptoms to know if they may be infected. It's a rapid test, and you can get a result on the same day.

All of our other sites listed below offer a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) tests. It takes some time to get the results because they are usually processed in a laboratory. Many people get their result the next day, but it may take up to 3 days. It is important that you get a PCR test if you have symptoms.

The nearest testing sites to the Langthorne Medical Centre are;

  • Church Lane car park, Leytonstone E11 1HG (Please note: this site is walk-in only), which is open every day from 8am to 8pm
  • Stanley Road car park, Leyton E10 7E (Please note: this site is walk-in only), which is open every day between 7am to 9pm
  • Jubilee Centre, Cathall Rd, Leytonstone, E11 4LA, entrance via the car park, which is open every day 10am to 7pm (unless otherwise stated)
  • Leyton Cricket Ground, 2 Crawley Road, Leyton, E10 6RJ, entrance is at the corner of Leyton High Road and Crawley Road, which is open every day 10am to 7pm (unless otherwise stated)

You can visit a mobile testing centre but you should not travel by public transport. Alternatively, you can book an appointment or a home test online or by calling 119. You can just turn up at one of the locations listed above for a test which are not mandatory. However, by getting tested you will be able to help protect your family and friends if you are found to have the virus. You’ll also be helping to stop the spread of the virus in the borough and protecting the health of everyone.

You will receive an e-mail and/or a text message with your test results from NHS Test and Trace. Only you will receive the results, outlining the results of your test, if you receive a positive test result from NHS Test and Trace you should begin self-isolating. The government has now reduced the time you have to isolate from 14 days to 10 days.

When coming in for a test, please bring some identification, a face covering (unless you are exempt) and a?Wi-Fi enabled electronic device to register your test with the NHS Test and Trace website. You may also wish to bring a bottle of water for after the test.

TESTS FOR PEOPLE WHO DON'T HAVE SYMPTOMS
Your local council, workplace, university or school may offer you a test even if you don’t have symptoms.

Sites are being set up where people without symptoms can take tests.

During national lockdown, some local councils are prioritising people who can’t work from home. Find your local council.

If you run a business that employs 50 or more people, you can register to order tests for employees who cannot work from home. Your business must be registered in England.

CARE HOME STAFF AND RESIDENTS
There’s a separate testing service for care home residents or staff members. You can still get tested even if you do not have symptoms.

IF YOU'RE GOING INTO HOSPITAL
You may need to get tested if you’re due to have surgery or a procedure.

The hospital will arrange this for you. Contact your hospital department if you have any questions.

ANTIBODY TESTING TO CHECK IF YOU'VE HAD CORONAVIRUS BEFORE
Antibody tests are to help the NHS and scientists learn more about who has already had the virus and how it has spread in the UK.

Free NHS antibody tests are only available to some people. This depends on:

  • Where you live (England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland)
  • What job you do

Find out more about antibody testing

TEST AND TRACE APP
The NHS test and trace App:

  • Ensures that anyone who develops symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) can quickly be tested to find out if they have the virus, and also includes targeted asymptomatic testing of NHS and social care staff and care home residents
  • Helps trace close recent contacts of anyone who tests positive for coronavirus and, if necessary, notifies them that they must self-isolate athome to help stop the spread of the virus

We have introduced this service to help return life more to normal, in a way that is safe and protects our NHS and social care. The service allows us to trace the spread of the virus and isolate new infections and play a vital role in giving us early warning if the virus is increasing again, locally or nationally.

You can get a free a test from the link below;

https://self-referral.test-for-coronavirus.service.gov.uk/antigen/essential-worker

If you don’t have access to the internet, you can order a test by phoning 119

For more information, please download our Test and Trace Document

The practice has prepared documents for self-isolation advice for our patient's who have to self-isolate.

Please select your document from the list below;

TESTING ADVICE FOR SELF-ISOLATION PATIENTS
Albanian Arabic Bulgarian Chinese (Cantonese) Chinese (Mandarin) English
French Hindi Italian Lithuanian Portuguese Polish
Romanian Russian Spanish Urdu        

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021
CORONAVIRUS RISK MATRIX
Number of staff risk assessed:   18 staff, 100%
Number of BAME employees:   13, 72% (Black, 9 Asian)
Percentage of staff risk assessed by staff group:   18 staff, 100%

Additional mitigation over and above the individual risk assessments in settings where infection rates are the highest:

  Staff who were travelling into work on public transport had their hours adjusted to miss the rush hour. One of our GP’s does not see any face-to-face patients due to her medical condition. Two of our GP’S are working from home due to their ages. Extra PPE was provided for staff including perspex screens for front desks.
     
RECEPTION AND ADMININSTRATION STAFF    
Low risk:      
Moderate Risk:      
High Risk:      
     
SURGICAL STAFF    
Low risk:      
Moderate Risk:      
High Risk:      
     
Signed: Debra Garey on Tuesday 16th June 2020
SHIELDING GUIDANCE
This guidance is for everyone in England who has been identified as clinically extremely vulnerable from COVID-19. This includes those people who have been identified by the NHS as being clinically extremely vulnerable and those identified through the COVID-19 Population Risk Assessment. All of those identified have been added to the Shielded Patient List, and more information on the criteria used is available below. If you have been identified as being clinically extremely vulnerable, you will previously have received a letter from the NHS or from your GP telling you this. You may also have been advised to shield in the past.

This guidance applies to clinically extremely vulnerable individuals only. Others living in a household with someone who is clinically extremely vulnerable are not advised to follow this guidance. They should instead follow the advice and restrictions that are in place for everyone in England.

WHAT HAS CHANGED?
Since January 2021, cases of COVID-19 have fallen significantly across the country, reducing the risk of catching the virus for everyone, including the most vulnerable. Shielding has only ever been a temporary measure to protect the most vulnerable during peaks of the pandemic. The latest peak has now passed, and the prevalence of the virus is now low enough that we can advise people no longer need to shield.

The Government has outlined its roadmap out of the lockdown, with a gradual easing of restrictions over the next few months that will apply to everyone. In addition, the vaccination programme continues to be rolled out to everyone, with prioritisation based on the advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). This will help pave the way for restrictions to be safely lifted.

Although the advice to shield has ended, clinically extremely vulnerable people must continue to follow the rules that are in place for everyone.

We are also advising clinically extremely vulnerable people to continue to take extra precautions to protect themselves. You are advised to follow the practical steps described below to minimise your risk of exposure to the virus.

VACCINATION
Everyone on the Shielded Patient List should already have been offered a COVID-19 vaccine. If you have not yet received your first dose, please contact your GP. If you have received your first dose, you should still ensure you take up your second dose of the vaccine when it is offered to you. Having two doses should further increase your level of protection.

For children aged 12 to 15 years, vaccination may be appropriate for those with severe neuro-disabilities. This option should be discussed between parents/guardians and the child’s clinician or GP. For other children aged 15 and under, whilst further research is being done, vaccination is not yet recommended.

No vaccine is 100% effective and therefore even if you have had both doses, there is still no absolute guarantee that you will not become ill from COVID-19. As such, you should continue to take the extra precautions set out in this guidance to help protect yourself.

SOCIALISING INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE HOME
You should continue to maintain social distancing when both indoors and outdoors. However, you do not need to socially distance from members of your household or support bubble.

You should wash your hands regularly and avoid touching your face.

Continue to minimise the number of social interactions that you have, whilst also observing the rules on meeting people you do not live with. The fewer social interactions you have, the lower your risk of catching COVID-19. Your risk of catching COVID-19 is also lower if you meet with others outdoors rather than indoors.

You are encouraged to go outside for exercise and can do so with people from outside your household, subject to the wider rules on social contact.

When it is allowed to meet people from outside your household or support bubble indoors, keep the area well ventilated with fresh air, for example by opening a window.

Try to reduce the amount of time you spend in settings where you are unable to maintain social distancing, or where other people’s activities may reduce their likelihood of maintaining social distancing.

You can continue to form or maintain existing support bubbles and childcare bubbles, if you are eligible.

WORK
Everyone is currently advised to work from home where possible.If you cannot work from home, we are no longer advising that you do not attend the workplace. Your employer is required to take steps to reduce the risk of exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace and should be able to explain to you the measures they have put in place to keep you safe at work. Some employers may introduce regular testing of employees as part of these measures. You may also want to consider how you get to and from work including if it is possible to avoid using public transport during rush hour.

Separate government guidance has been issued on how employers can make workplaces COVID-safe, including how they can maintain social distancing and a system of risk management in your workplace. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has also published guidance on protecting vulnerable workers, including advice for employers and employees on how to talk about reducing risks in the workplace.

If you need support to work at home or in the workplace you can apply for Access to Work. Access to Work may provide support for the disability-related extra costs of working that are beyond standard reasonable adjustments an employer must provide.

If you have access to occupational health and employee assistance programmes in the workplace, these services can also provide you with a range of health support and advice for your physical and mental health needs.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (furlough) has been extended until 30 September. You may continue to be eligible throughout this period, even when shielding is paused, providing your employer agrees. The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) has also been extended until 30 September.

From 1 April you will no longer be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) or Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) on the basis of being advised to shield, given the lifting of shielding measures nationally. You may be eligible for SSP or ESA if you are sick or incapable of work, either due to coronavirus or other health reasons, subject to meeting the eligibility conditions.

If you have concerns about your health and safety at work then you can raise them with your workplace union, HSE or your local authority. Where employers are not managing the risk of COVID-19, HSE and local authorities will take action which can range from the provision of specific advice, issuing enforcement notices, stopping certain work practices until they are made safe and, where businesses fail to comply with enforcement notices, this could lead to prosecution.

The existing employment rights framework provides protections against discrimination, unfair dismissal and detriment. Specific guidance has been published for employers and workers on work absences due to coronavirus (COVID-19).

The Citizens Advice Bureau also has information about your rights at work and how to solve problems in the workplace. If you have concerns you can also get advice on your specific situation and your employment rights by visiting the Acas website or calling the Acas helpline on 0300 123 1100.

EDUCATION
The It is important that children attend school for their education, wellbeing, mental health and long-term development. Clinically extremely vulnerable pupils and students should return to their school or other educational setting from 1 April. This includes early years provision, wraparound childcare and applicable out-of-school settings. Children who live in a household with someone who is clinically extremely vulnerable are not advised to shield and should have returned to school or college on 8 March.

Where parents are concerned about their child’s attendance, they should speak to their child’s school about their concerns and discuss the protective measures that have been put in place to reduce the risk. They should also discuss other measures that can be put in place to ensure their children can regularly attend school.

The use of rapid lateral flow tests allows us to identify individuals with coronavirus (COVID-19) who do not have symptoms, which make up around a third of all cases. Finding asymptomatic cases, along with other infection prevention and control measures such as social distancing, can help us manage the spread of the virus.

To safeguard the health of the teaching workforce and keep as many staff, pupils and students in school and college as possible, we have made rapid lateral flow tests available to schools and colleges. Lateral flow tests can also be accessed directly for households, childcare and support bubbles of primary and secondary school pupils and for households, childcare and support bubbles of primary and secondary school staff. This testing will also help keep safe those in the community who are clinically extremely vulnerable and their families.

All secondary schools and colleges are continuing to put in place a range of protective measures to help minimise the risk of spreading COVID-19. These include social distancing, handwashing, use of face coverings in specific situations, bubbles, enhancing cleaning, ventilation and managing confirmed cases.

All education settings have implemented a range of protective measures recommended by Public Health England (PHE) which, when followed, create an inherently safer environment for early years children, pupils, students, staff and families.

TRAVEL
If you need to use public transport, you must wear a face covering unless you are exempt. Consider travelling outside peak hours to reduce the number of people with whom you come into contact.

If you do travel, walk or cycle if you can. For longer journeys, or if you are unable to walk or cycle, try to minimise the number of people you come into close contact with.

You may want to avoid car sharing with people from outside your household or support bubble, and ensure that you use a face covering when using taxis.

GOING TO SHOPS AND PHARMACIES
While you are not advised to avoid going to the shops, you may wish to continue using online delivery for food and essential shopping, or to ask family and friends for help. If you do go out to the shops or pharmacy, consider going at quieter times of the day. You must wear a face covering in all shops unless you are exempt.

If you have already registered for priority access to supermarket delivery slots using the Shielding Support website or through your council by 31 March, then we can confirm that the participating supermarkets will continue to offer priority access until 21 June. After this date individuals can continue to book deliveries from a supermarket..

The NHS Volunteer Responders programme is available to help support those who need it. Volunteers can collect and deliver shopping, medication and other essential supplies. Call 0808 196 3646 between 8am and 8pm, 7 days a week to self-refer or visit NHS Volunteer Responders for further information.

IF YOU REQUIRE ADDITIONAL CARE AND SUPPORT
It is important that you continue to receive the care and support you need to help you stay safe and well. Providers of social care and medical services are making every effort to ensure services remain open and as safe as possible.

You should continue to seek support from the NHS for your existing health conditions. You can access a range of NHS services from home, including ordering repeat prescriptions or contacting your health professional through an online consultation. To find out more visit NHS Health at home, or download the NHS App. If you have an urgent medical need, call NHS 111 or, for a medical emergency, dial 999.

It is also important to look after your mental health. Go to the Every Mind Matters website for advice and practical steps that you can take to support your wellbeing and manage your mental health during this pandemic and beyond. The Let’s Talk Loneliness website also has a variety of tips, advice and further resources that you may find helpful.

If you or someone you care for experiences a mental health crisis, we urge you to make contact with a local health professional immediately. NHS Mental Health Trusts have established 24/7 telephone lines to support people of all ages to get the help they need, when they need it.

Any carers or visitors who support you with your everyday needs can continue to visit. They should continue to follow social distancing guidance where close or personal contact is not required.

You can also access additional support from your energy supplier. Energy suppliers are required by the regulator, Ofgem, to hold a register of customers in a vulnerable circumstance, called a Priority Service Register. If you are clinically extremely vulnerable you can be added to this register. For information about how to be added to the register and the additional services your supplier can provide you, please visit Ofgem’s website.

Telecom providers are also required by their regulator, Ofcom, to support their vulnerable customers. For information about the additional services your supplier may be able to provide you as a vulnerable customer, please visit Ofcom’s website.

If you are struggling as a result of Coronavirus please visit www.gov.uk/find-coronavirus-support or contact your local council to find out what support is available.

DEFIITION OF CLINICALLY EXTREMELY VULNERABLE GROUPS
People who are defined as clinically extremely vulnerable are at very high risk of severe illness from coronavirus. There are 2 ways you may be identified as clinically extremely vulnerable:

  1. You have one or more of conditions listed below, or
  2. Your clinician or GP has added you to the Shielded Patient List because, based on their clinical judgement, they deem to you be at higher risk of serious illness if you catch the virus.

If you do not fall into any of these categories, and have not been contacted to inform you that you are on the Shielded Patient List, follow the general staying alert and safe guidance for the rest of the population.

If you think there are good clinical reasons why you should be added to the Shielded Patient List, discuss your concerns with your GP or hospital clinician.

People with the following conditions are automatically deemed clinically extremely vulnerable:

Solid organ transplant recipients

People with specific cancers:

  1. People with cancer who are undergoing active chemotherapy
  2. People with lung cancer who are undergoing radical radiotherapy
  3. People with cancers of the blood or bone marrow such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma who are at any stage of treatment
  4. People having immunotherapy or other continuing antibody treatments for cancer
  5. People having other targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system, such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors
  6. People who have had bone marrow or stem cell transplants in the last 6 months or who are still taking immunosuppression drugs
  7. People with severe respiratory conditions including all cystic fibrosis, severe asthma and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
    people with rare diseases that significantly increase the risk of infections (such as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), homozygous sickle cell disease)
  8. People on immunosuppression therapies sufficient to significantly increase risk of infectionproblems with your spleen, for example splenectomy (having your spleen removed)
  9. Adults with Down’s syndrome
  10. Adults on dialysis or with chronic kidney disease (stage 5)
  11. Women who are pregnant with significant heart disease, congenital or acquired
  12. Other people who have also been classed as clinically extremely vulnerable, based on clinical judgement and an assessment of their needs. GPs and hospital clinicians have been provided with guidance to support these decisions

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021

CORONAVIRUS VACCCINATIONS
The NHS is currently offering the COVID-19 vaccine to people most at risk from coronavirus.

The vaccine is being offered in some hospitals, some pharmacies and hundreds of local vaccination centres run by GPs.

It's being given to:

  • Some people aged 80 and over who already have a hospital appointment in the next few weeks
  • People who live or work in care homes
  • Health and social care workers at high risk

You will also need to be registered with a GP surgery in England. You can register with a GP if you do not have one.

The vaccine will be offered more widely, and at other locations, as soon as possible.

The order in which people will be offered the vaccine is based on advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

Read the latest JCVI advice on priority groups for the COVID-19 vaccination on GOV.UK

The vaccine will be delivered to the following prioritised groups.

  • Residents in a care home for older adults and their carers
  • All those 80 years of age and over and frontline health and social care workers
  • All those 75 years of age and over
  • All those 70 years of age and over and clinically extremely vulnerable individuals
  • All those 65 years of age and over
  • All individuals aged 16 years to 64 years with underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of serious disease and mortality
  • All those 60 years of age and over
  • All those 55 years of age and over
  • All those 50 years of age and over

 

 

 

For more information about how the vaccinations are being delivered in Waltham Forest and the rest of London, please click here

COVID-19 VACCINE - 29TH APRIL 2021

  • If you are aged 40 or over
  • You'll turn 40 before 1st July 2021
  • You are at high risk from coronavirus (clinically extremely vulnerable)
  • If you are a frontline health and social care worker
  • You have a condition that puts you at higher risk (clinically vulnerable)
  • If you are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or if you are the main carer of an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if you fall ill
  • If have a learning dificulty
  • If you think you are an eligible unpaid carer who has not been contacted for your coronavirus please contact one of our receptionists

If you were under 30 years old on March 2021, you will not be offered appointments for the Oxford Astra\Zeneca vaccine. There maybe fewer appointments available to you, or you may hav to travel further.

If you are pregnant, speak to a healthcare professional from your maternity team or one of our GP's before booking your vaccine. It's preferred that you hvave the Maderna or Phizer/BioNTech vaccines, which are not available at all vaccination sites.

We are sending out patients to the Covid-19 vaccination hub at;

  • Walthamstow Library, Central Library High Street, London E17 7JN

Click here for directions and maps to the above vaccination centre

The NHS is prioritising vaccinating people who experts have agreed will benefit the most. We will let you know when it is your turn. Please see here for advice.

There is comprehensive information, guidance, and answers to questions, including vaccination information for frontline health and social care staff, carers and clinical vulnerable at COVID-19 Vaccination programme | East London Health & Care Partnership

BOOK YOUR VACCINATIONS
You need to:

  • Have 2 doses of the coronavirus vaccine at 2 appointments
  • Book both appointments at the same time
  • Get the 2nd dose 11 to 12 weeks after getting your 1st dose

You can use this service for someone else.

If you've had a positive COVID-19 test, you should wait 4 weeks from the date you had the test before you book an appointment.

If you're under 30, you will not be offered appointments for the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine. There may be fewer appointments available or you may have to travel further.

MANAGE YOUR APPOINTMENTS
If you already have appointments booked, you can:

  • View your appointments
  • Cancel your appointments
  • Book appointments again

We will ask you some questions first, so we can find your bookings.

You must be registered with a GP surgery in England to use this service. You can register with a GP if you do not have one.

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021

COVID-19 HOTELS
UK nationals and residents returning to Britain from "red list" countries will be forced to quarantine for 10 days in government-provided accommodation in hotels from Monday 15th February 2021.

Travellers arriving in the UK - whether by boat, train or plane - are already required to show proof of a negative Covid-19 test to be allowed entry.

This test must be taken in the 72 hours before travelling, and anyone arriving without one faces a fine of up to £500, with Border Force officials carrying out spot checks.

They must also provide contact details and their UK address. They can then travel - by public transport if necessary - to the place where they plan to self-isolate.

Passengers required to stay in a quarantine hotel will need to reserve a room online.

Travellers having to stay in quarantine hotels in England will be charged £1,750 for their stay.

The £1,750 fee for an individual includes;

  • The hotel with three meals, tea, coffee and water but other items will be available at an extra cost through room service
  • The cost of transport and testing. The additional rate for one extra adult or a child aged over 12 is £650, and for a child aged five to 12 it is £325

These travellers will only be allowed to enter the UK through a "small number of ports that currently account for the vast majority of passenger arrivals"

  • Those who fail to quarantine in a government-sanctioned hotel for 10 days face fines of up to £10,000
  • Travellers arriving into England who lie on their passenger locator forms about visiting a red list country face a fine of £10,000 or up to 10 years in jail. The penalties include a £1,000 fine for travellers who fail to take mandatory tests and a £2,000 fine for failing to take the second mandatory test - along with a 14-day extension to quarantine.
 
Travellers travelling from red list countries to Wales and Northern Ireland will be required to book and pay for quarantine in England, as neither destination currently has any direct international flights.

Travellers will be required to get a test on days two and eight of their 10-day quarantine period, whether they are isolating at home or in a hotel. The tests, conducted by NHS Test and Trace, will cost travellers £210.

For those facing significant financial hardship as a result of this charge, there will be an opportunity to apply for a deferred repayment plan when booking. This is only available for individuals who already receive income-related benefits, and you will be required to pay back your debt to the government in 12 monthly installments.

All package prices will be reviewed before the end of March and may change. While hotels normally set a zero fee for children aged under 3, the government is setting this for children under 5 years old because they will not be tested. The proposed zero fee for children under 5 years old will mean that for the present the government will bear the costs of additional food and drinks consumed by arrivals aged between 3 and 5 years old.

You must not apply for deferred payment if you are not eligible. If you provide false information, or omit key information that has been asked for in your application, you will be committing fraud and liable for conviction.

If you have not arranged a quarantine package prior to your arrival in England, you face a penalty of up to £4,000 and will still have to pay for your quarantine package on arrival.

If you’re required to quarantine in a quarantine hotel you can only arrive in England at certain ports of entry. In London, these are:

  • Heathrow Airport
  • Gatwick Airport
  • London City Airport

If you’re required to quarantine in a managed quarantine hotel and do not arrive in England at one of the designated ports of entry, you may face a penalty of up to £10,000 and will be charged for the cost of transportation to the nearest designated port or entry.

You will be able to seek medical attention, including for repeat prescriptions and/or if you need to fill a prescription.

The "test to release scheme" - where travellers from non-red list countries can leave home isolation after a negative test on day five - will remain under the new testing rules.

Passengers will be expected to use the gold-standard and more expensive PCR tests.

Lockdown rules mean people must only travel abroad for essential reasons. These are the same as the "reasonable excuses" for domestic travel, including:

  • Work that cannot be done from home
  • Medical appointments
  • Educational reasons

People leaving England will soon have to make a declaration on why they need to travel, which will be checked by carriers prior to departure.

For more information please visit the .gov page

Website updated on Saturday 1st May 2021

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