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Carers FIRST is a charity supporting adult and young carers, working across Lincolnshire, South and North West Kent, Medway and the London Borough of Waltham Forest.

We provide emotional and practical support, advice, information, guidance and offer carers assessments, training, events, social groups, short break respite, activities trips and more.

  • You can contact us by calling our Carers Hub on 030 0303 1555 where someone will be available to take your call
  • Our Carers Hub team are available Monday-Thursday 9am - 5pm, Fridays 9am - 4:30pm

For further information please speak to one of our receptionists.

or, visit the Carer's First website, you can download and print a referral form from here.

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019

IMMUNISATIONS
The surgery provides medical serives for all types of vaccinations amd immunistions, including child and travel vaccinations. Influenza (Flu) vaccinations are offered to over 65 year olds, high risk patients, such as Asthma COPS, Diabeteics and Heart Disease patients once a year from October to December.

Children's immunisations start at 2 months of age. You will receive a letter reminding you when your child's immunisations are due.

The Complete Routine Immunisation Schedule from 1st April 2018

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019
SHINGLES
Shingles, or Herpes Zoster, is condition caused by a re-occurance of the Chickenpox virus. After you've had the virus, the virus stays inactive in your nervous system and can re-introduce later on in life, causing shingles. It is not clear what causes the virus to reactivate, but it occurs more in the elderly and causes a painful rash on one side of the body.

Around 1 in 4 adults can develop shingles in their lifetime. The immune system weakens as we get older, increasing the chances of Shingles, more severe in people aged over 70 years.

The symptoms of shingles can range from mild to severe and can be very unpleasant.

Shingles affects one side of the body, on the trunkm head, neck or the eye, starting with a headache and tiredness. It is common to feel tingling or burning sensations in the area of the skin before a rash appears. From a few days to 3 weeks, a severe red rash appears, which eventually turns in very painful fluid-filled blisters.

After a few days, the blisters dry out and take 2 - 4 weeks to heal, with most people recovering, however some can may experience long-term effects;

  • Post-herpetic Neurolgia (PHN) - An unpleasant nerve pain lasting from weeks to months, or years for a few people. PHN affects the quality of life and even a slight breeze against the skin can very painful. The older you are the more pain you are most likely to be in
  • Sometimes shingles can develop in the eye affecting the skin or the eyelid, causing severe pain, decreased vision and blindness in the affected eye
  • Scarring
  • Skin Infections
  • Hearing Loss

TREATMENTS
Shingles varies from person to person, while some require treatment. See your GP as soon as possible, within 72 hours of the rash occuring, as early treatment can help to reduce the risk of complications. You may also be prescribed painkilling or antiviral medication.

PREVENTION
The Department of Health has introduced a National Shingles Immunisation Program to protect those at risk, the vaccination is recommended for 70-79 year olds, however not everyone will be eligible this year. If you are eligible, you will be asked to visit your GP.

From September 2013, people aged 70 and 79 are eligible for the vaccination, other age groups will be introduced in the futures ensuring that people aged 70-79 are offered the Shingles vaccination.

The brand name of the Shingles vaccine given in the UK is Vostavax, it can be given at any time of the year.

Read the patient information leaflet (PIL) for Zostavax.

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

For test results, please contact the practice between 2.30PM and 4.30PM

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019
FLU IN ADULTS
Influenza or the Flu, is a viral infection that can affect us at any age and mainly in the winter months. We can catch it by breathing in drops of air that contain the virus. Typically the symptoms start to develop within 3 days;
  • A high temperature of 38C (100.4f) or above
  • Tiredness ir weakness
  • A headache
  • Aches and pains
  • A dry, chesty cough

Flu can make you feel so exhausted and unwell that you have to stay in bed and rest until you feel better

THOSE OF US AT RISK FROM THE FLU;

  • You're 65 years of age or over
  • You're pregnant
  • Children and adults with an underlying health condition (such as long-term heart or respiratory disease)
  • Children and adults with weakened immune systems

Anyone in these risk groups is more likely to develop potentially serious complications of flu, such as pneumonia (a lung infection), so it's recommended that they have a flu vaccine every year to help protect them.

WHO SHOULD GET THE FLU VACCINE?

  • Adults 65 and over (including adults over 18 at the risk of flu)
  • Pregant women
  • Children aged 2 and 3
  • Children in reception class and school years 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
  • Children aged 2 to 17 years at the risk of flu

For 2018, there are 3 types of flu vaccine;

  • A live quadrivalent vaccine (which protects against 4 strains of flu), given as a nasal spray. This is for children and young people aged 2 to 17 years eligible for the flu vaccine
  • A quadrivalent injected vaccine. This is for adults aged 18 and over but below the age of 65 who are at increased risk from flu because of a long-term health condition and for children 6 months and above in an eligible group who cannot receive the live vaccine
  • An adjuvanted trivalent injected vaccine. This is for people aged 65 and over as it has been shown to be more effective in this age group

If your child is aged between 6 months and 2 years old and is in a high-risk group for flu, they will be offered an injected flu vaccine as the nasal spray is not licensed for children under 2.

 

BOOKING YOUR APPOINTMENT
Appointments will take place from September 2018

Please ask a receptionist to book your flu jab when we advertise flu appointment times

Speak to one of our GP's, or one of our practice nurse's for more information about these vaccines.

Find out more about who should have the flu vaccine.

65 AND OVERS AND THE FLU VACCINE
You are eligible for the flu vaccine this year (2018/19) if you will be aged 65 and over on March 31 2019 – that is, you were born on or before March 31 1954. So, if you are currently 64 but will be 65 on March 31 2019, you do qualify.

HOW LONG DOES THE FLU LAST AND IS IT SERIOUS?
If you have flu, you generally start to feel ill within a few days of being infected.

You should begin to feel much better within a week or so, although you may feel tired for much longer.

You will usually be most infectious from the day your symptoms start and for a further three to seven days. Children and people with weaker immune systems may remain infectious for longer.

Most people will make a full recovery and won't experience any further problems, but elderly people and people with certain long-term medical conditions are more likely to have a bad case of flu or develop a serious complication, such as a chest infection.

HOW CAN YOU CATCH THE FLU?
The virus is contained in the millions of tiny droplets that come out of the nose and mouth when someone who is infected coughs or sneezes.

These droplets typically spread about one metre. They hang suspended in the air for a while before landing on surfaces, where the virus can survive for up to 24 hours.

Anyone who breathes in the droplets can catch flu. You can also catch the virus by touching the surfaces that the droplets have landed on if you pick up the virus on your hands and then touch your nose or mouth.

Everyday items at home and in public places can easily become contaminated with the flu virus, including food, door handles, remote controls, handrails, telephone handsets and computer keyboards. Therefore, it's important to wash your hands frequently.

You can catch flu many times, because flu viruses change regularly and your body won't have natural resistance to the new versions.

PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF FLU
You can help stop yourself catching flu or spreading it to others with good hygiene measures.
Always wash your hands regularly with soap and warm water, as well as:

  • Regularly cleaning surfaces such as your computer keyboard, telephone and door handles to get rid of germs
  • Using tissues to cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
  • Putting used tissues in a bin as soon as possible

You can also help stop the spread of flu by avoiding unnecessary contact with other people while you're infectious. You should stay off work or school until you're feeling better.

In some people at risk of more serious flu, an annual flu vaccine or antiviral medication may be recommended to help reduce the risk of becoming infected.

THE FLU VACCINE
The flu vaccine is available for free on the NHS for:

  • Your GP surgery
  • A local pharmacy offering the service
  • Your midwifery service if they offer it for pregnant women

Some community pharmacies now offer flu vaccination to adults (but not children) at risk of flu including pregnant women, people aged 65 and over, people with long-term health conditions and carers.

If you have your flu vaccine at a pharmacy, you don't have to inform your GP – it is up to the pharmacist to do that.

FLU COMPLICATIONS
Most of us recover from the flu after a couple of weeks, some of us will develop life threatening complications such as Pneumonia, Nerve and Brain Damage. These complications are more likely to occur if our bodies are already weakened in some way;

  • Do you have lung disease such as severe Asthma, Emphysema or Chronic Bronchitis?
  • Do you have Heart Disease, Kidney Disease, Chronic Liver Disease or Diabetes?
  • Are you receiving Chemotherapy or Steroid Treatment or do you have HIV/AIDS?
  • Do you have Multiple Sclerosis or a related condition?
  • Do you have a degenerative disease of the Central Nervous System?
  • Are you the main carter for an elderly or disabled person who's welfare may be at risk if you fall?
  • Are you pregnant?
  • Are you aged 65 or over?

If the answer is yes to any of the above questions, contact the practice to book an appointment with one of our clinicians.

AVOIDING THE FLU
The flu virus is constantly changing, the best way to avoid the flu is to have a free flu jab during the Autumn months of September to November. The vaccination rarely causes problems, however there maybe temporary and slight soreness at the injection site, and a few of us may get a mild fever that lasts for 1 or 2 days.

If you are allergic to any of the ingredients in the vaccine, or if you have had a previous reaction to the flu jab;

  • You should not have a flu vaccination
  • You should also let your GP practice know if you are allergic to any antibiotics before receiving the vaccine

While this won't prevent us from getting coughs and colds, it will offer protection against the strains of flu that the World Health Organisation (WHO) has identified we are at risk from in the flu season.

IF YOU ARE PREGNANT, DO YOU NEED THE VACCINATION THIS YEAR?
Yes, all pregnant women should have the vaccinations, protecting themselves and the unborn child (children). The vaccinations can be given safely from conceptions and all women benefit as the vaccination;

  • Reduces the complications of pneumonia
  • Reduces the risks of miscarriage or having a child born too early or with low birth weight complications
  • Helps to protect the baby with some immunisation to the flu during the first few months of the child's life

If you are pregnant and you think you may have the flu, there is a prescribed medication that might help or reduce the risks of complications, but it need to be taken very soon after the symptoms appear.

If you've already had the vaccination, you should still have the vaccination to protect you other flu viruses as as soon as the illness has gone.

HOW EFFECTIVE IS THE FLU VACCINE?
Flu vaccine is the best protection we have against an unpredictable virus that can cause unpleasant illness in children and severe illness and death among at-risk groups, including older people, pregnant women and those with an underlying medical health condition.

Studies have shown that the flu vaccine will help prevent you getting the flu. It won't stop all flu viruses and the level of protection may vary, so it's not a 100% guarantee that you'll be flu-free, but if you do get flu after vaccination it's likely to be milder and shorter-lived than it would otherwise have been.

There is also evidence to suggest that the flu vaccine can reduce your risk of having a stroke.

Over time, protection from the injected flu vaccine gradually decreases and flu strains often change. So new flu vaccines are produced each year, which is why people advised to have the flu vaccine need it every year too.

Read more about how the flu vaccine works.

FLU VACCINE SIDE EFFECTS
Serious side effects of the injected flu vaccine are very rare. You may have a mild fever and aching muscles for a couple of days after having the vaccine, and your arm may be a bit sore where you were injected.

Side effects of the nasal spray vaccine may commonly include a runny or blocked nose, headache, tiredness and some loss of appetite.

Read more about the side effects of the flu vaccine.

HOW SAFE IS THE FLU VACCINE
The flu vaccines used in the national programme have a good safety record.

WHEN TO HAVE THE FLU VACCINE
The best time to have a flu vaccine is in the autumn, from the beginning of October to end of November, but don't worry if you've missed it, you can have the vaccine later in winter. Book an appointment with one our practice nurse's.

THE FLU VACCINE FOR 2018/2019
Each year, the viruses that are most likely to cause flu are identified in advance and the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends which type of flu virus strains to include in the vaccine.

IS THERE ANYONE WHO SHOULDN'T HAVE THE FLU VACCINE?
Most adults can have the injected flu vaccine, but you should avoid it if you have had a serious allergic reaction to a flu vaccine in the past.

Read more about who shouldn't have the flu vaccine.

You can find out more by reading the answers to the most common questions that people have about the flu vaccine.

RESOURCES

Website updated on on Wednesday 12th July 2016, next review date due: Friday 12th July 2019

FLU IN CHILDREN

AT WHAT AGE SHOULD CHILDREN HAVE THE NASAL SPRAY FLU VACCINE?
In the Autumn/winter of 2018/2019, the vaccine will be available free on the NHS for eligible children, including:

  • Children aged 2 and 3 on August 31 2018 – that is, children born between September 1st 2014 and August 31st 2016
  • Children in school years 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
  • In some parts of the country, all primary school-aged children will be offered the vaccine (following a pilot in some areas
  • Children aged 2 to 17 with long-term health conditions

Over the next few years the programme will be extended gradually to include older children.

WHO WILL GIVE THE CHILDREN'S FLU VACCINATION
Children aged 2 and 3 years will be given the vaccination at their general practice, usually by the practice nurse.

Children that are 4 years old are also eligible for flu vaccination provided they were 4 on the 31 August 2018.

Children in reception class and school years 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 will be offered their vaccination in school. In a couple of areas it might be offered in primary care settings.

Children who are home educated will also be offered the vaccine, provided they are in an eligible age group. Parents can obtain information about arrangements from their local NHS England Public Health Commissioning team.

CHLIDREN AT HIGH RISK FROM THE FLU
Children aged 2 to 17 with long-term health conditions such as diabetes are at higher risk from flu.

It's especially important that they are vaccinated with the annual flu nasal spray instead of the annual flu jab, which they were previously given. Children between the ages of 6 months and 2 years who are at high risk from flu are offered the annual flu jab, usually at their GP surgery.

WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF THE FLU NASAL SPRAY FOR CHILDREN?
The main one is getting a runny nose after vaccination for a few days.

Read more about the side effects of the flu vaccine for children.

Talk to the GP, practice nurse or your child's school nurse if you want more information about when and how your child will be vaccinated against flu.

 

BOOKING YOUR APPOINTMENT
Appointments will take place from September 2018

Please ask a receptionist to book your flu jab when we advertise flu appointment times

If you haven't heard from their GP by early November 2018, contact them directly to make an appointment.

HOW IS THE NASAL SPRAY GIVEN
The vaccine is given as a single spray squirted up each nostril. Not only is it needle-free – a big advantage for children – the nasal spray is quick, painless, and works even better than the injected flu vaccine.

The vaccine is absorbed very quickly. It will still work even if, after the vaccination, your child develops a runny nose, sneezes or blows their nose.

Read the patient information leaflet for the nasal spray flu vaccine.

ARE THERE ANY CHILDREN WHO SHOULD DELAY HAVING THE NASAL SPRAY FLU VACCINE?
Children should have their nasal spray flu vaccination delayed if they:

  • Have a runny or blocked nose
  • Are wheezy

If a child has a fever, the vaccination can be delayed until they feel better.

If a child is wheezy or has been wheezy in the past week, their vaccination should be postponed until they have been wheeze-free for at least 3 days.

If a child has a heavily blocked or runny nose, it might stop the vaccine getting into their system. In this case, their flu vaccination can be postponed until their nasal symptoms have cleared up.

ARE THERE ANY CHILDREN WHO SHOULD NOT HAVE THE NASAL SPRAY FLU VACCINE?
There are a few children who should avoid the nasal spray flu vaccine.

The vaccine is not recommended for children who have:
  • A severely weakened immune system
  • Severe egg allergy
  • Severe asthma – that is, those being treated with steroid tablets or high-dose inhaled steroids
  • An allergy to any of the vaccine ingredients, such as neomycin
  • A condition that requires salicylate treatment

Children unable to have the nasal spray vaccine may be able to have the injectable flu vaccine instead. If you're unsure, check with the school immunisation team or the nurse or GP at your surgery.

WHY ARE CHILDREN OFFERED THE FLU VACCINE?
Flu is a very common infection in babies and children. It can be very unpleasant for them.

Children with flu have the same symptoms as adults – including fever, chills, aching muscles, headache, stuffy nose, dry cough and a sore throat lasting up to a week.

Some children develop a very high fever or complications of flu, such as bronchitis, pneumonia and a painful middle ear infection.

They may need hospital treatment, and very occasionally a child may die from flu.

In fact, healthy children under the age of five are more likely to have to be admitted to hospital with flu than any other age group.

For children with long-term health conditions such as diabetes, asthma, heart disease or lung disease, getting flu can be very serious as they are more at risk of developing serious complications;

Learn about the five reasons to vaccinate your child against flu.

Read more about the complications of flu.

HOW SAFE IS THE FLU VACCINATION FOR CHILDREN?
The flu vaccine for children has a good safety record. In the UK, millions of children have been vaccinated safely and successfully.

HOW DOES THE FLU VACCINATION WORK?
The vaccine contains live but weakened flu viruses that do not cause flu in children. It will help your child build up immunity to flu in a similar way as natural infection, but without the symptoms.

Because the main flu viruses change each year, a new nasal spray vaccine has to be given each year, in the same way as the injectable flu vaccine.

STOPPING THE SPREADING OF FLU
The nasal spray flu vaccine will not only help protect your child against flu, the infection will also be less able to spread from them to their family, carers and the wider population.

Children spread flu because they generally don't use tissues properly or wash their hands.

Vaccinating children also protects others that are vulnerable to flu, such as babies, older people, pregnant women and people with serious long-term illnesses.

HOW MANY DOSES OF THE FLU VACCINATION DO CHILDREN NEED?
Most children only need a single dose of the nasal spray.

The patient information leaflet provided with the nasal spray suggests children should be given two doses of this vaccine if they've not had flu vaccine before.

However, the NHS vaccination programme has advised that healthy children only need a single dose because a second dose of the vaccine provides little additional protection.

Children aged two to nine years at risk of flu because of an underlying medical condition, who have not received flu vaccine before, should have two doses of the nasal spray given at least four weeks apart.

Read answers to some of the common questions parents have about the flu vaccine for children.

Website updated on Sunday 10th July 2016, next review date due: Wednesday 10th July 2019

ROTAVIRUS
An oral vaccine against rotavirus infection, a common cause of diarrhoea and sickness, is given as two doses for babies aged two and three months, alongside their other routine childhood vaccinations.

The vaccine is given as a liquid from a dropper straight into the baby’s mouth for them to swallow.

Rotavirus is a highly infectious stomach bug that typically strikes babies and young children, causing an unpleasant bout of diarrhoea, sometimes with vomiting, tummy ache and fever. Most children recover at home within a few days, but nearly one in five will need to see their doctor, and one in 10 of these end up in hospital as a result of complications such as extreme dehydration. A very small number of children die from rotavirus infection each year.

Rotavirus vaccination is available routinely on the NHS as part of the childhood vaccination programme for babies aged two months and three months.

The brand name of the rotavirus vaccine used in the UK is Rotarix.

Read the patient information leaflet (PIL) for Rotarix.

HOW DOWS THE ROTAVIRUS VACCINE WORK?
Some of the rotavirus is in the vaccine and this helps your baby to build up immunity, so that the next time they come into contact with rotavirus they will not get the disease. The rotavirus in the vaccine is weakened, so your baby won’t get rotavirus disease just from having the vaccination.

WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF THE ROTAVIRUS VACCINE?
The vast majority of babies won’t have any problems at all after having their rotavirus vaccination, although some babies who have the vaccine may become restless and irritable, and some may develop mild diarrhoea.

It is possible for a baby to get rotavirus infection after being vaccinated – but it's usually milder than it would have been if they hadn’t been vaccinated. They can also get a positive rotavirus test after being vaccinated, but this does not usually last for very long – your doctor will not be able to tell whether the positive test is due to the vaccine or the natural infection.

Read more about rotavirus vaccine side effects.

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019
MEN B

WHAT IS THE MEN B VACCINATION?
A new vaccine to prevent meningitis is being offered to babies as part of the NHS Childhood Vaccination Programme. It is recommended for babies aged from 2 months, with a second dose at 4 months, with a booster at 12 months of age.

The Men B vaccination will protect your baby against infection by Meningococcal Group B bacteria, resonsponsible for 90% of infections in young children.

The new programme makes England the first country in the world to offer a national, routine and publicly funded Men B vaccination programme.

The vaccine has the brand name Besxsero, and is given, as single injection into the babies thigh. It can asllo be given at the same time as other baby vaccinations, such as the 5-in-1 vaccine pneumoccocal vaccine.

For further information read the Patient Information Leaflet For Bexsero.

The practice will automatically send you an appointment for you to bring your baby in for their Men B vaccination alongside their other routine vaccinations. There is baby baby clinic ran in the centre, which operates every Wednesday

MEN B VACCINE AND FEVER
Babies given the Men B vaccine alongisde theire other routine vaccinations at 2 and 4 months are likely to develop a fever within the first 24 hours, it is recommended that you give your child liquid paracetamol gollowing the vaccination ti reduce the risk of fever. Other common side effects include irritation and redness at the point of injection.

DIFFERENT TYPES OF MENNINGITIS VACCINES
There are 2 types of vaccines against the common strains of Menigoccoccal disease;

  • The Men ACWY accine (against Meningoccoccal groups A, C, W and Y) which is offered on the NHS to teenagers and first time students.
  • The Men C vaccine (against Meningoccoccal group C) for babies.

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019
TRAVEL IMMUNISATIONS
Patients, who wish to travel abroad will need to book an appointment with the practice nurse. This should be within 4-6 weeks before travelling.

The practice has a duty to provide nursing care to all patient's and has to create a balance of appointment types. For this reason, a maximum of 3 patient's can be booked into any one nursing session for travel vaccinations. Some families may have to be booked over more than one session.

There is a real risk of catching a small number of serious diseases, even in the Mediterranean so check with the surgery in plenty of time before you travel to ensure that you are protected.

Please book your immunisations 4-6 weeks before you plan to travel, as you will need to book 2 appointments;

  1. Please make sure that you have completed a travel risk assessment form before you attend this appointment, as you may not be seen without the completed form.
  2. The 2nd appointment for being given the immunisation (s).

Please note that not all travel immunisations are not available on the NHS.

NHS nurse's are not able to administer travel vaccinations within 10 days of travel. In this case, patient's will have to go to a travel clinic.

Click on the links below to find out information and countries and immunisations via the links below;

  Europe and Russia   North America   Central America   South America   Carribean
  Africa   Middle East   Central Asia   East Asia   Australasia and Pacific

It is important to book the appointment at least 6 weeks before you are due to travel as a second appointment is needed with the nurse before you travel to allow the vaccinations to take effect.

Some travel vaccinations are ordered on private prescriptions and are charged. Our clinicians give the vaccinations (this appointment has to be at least 2 week charges over the normal prescription charge, this is because not all travel vaccinations are included in the services provided by the NHS.

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019
OUR NURSE'S
Our nurses provide the following to our patient's
  • Postnatal checks
  • Maternity bookings
  • New patient health checks
  • Wound dressings
  • The removal of sutures
  • Blood pressure checks
  • I.M/Subcut immunisations (B12 and travel immunisations)
  • Blood sugar monitoring and checks
  • NHS health checks
  • Pill checks
  • Shingles immunisations
  • Flu immunisations
  • Childhood Vaccinations
  • Cervical screening

 

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019

IF YOUR DEPRESSED, STRESSED OR ANXIOUS

WE CAN HELP!!!

HOW CAN WE HELP?
We offer both individual and group therapies, such as;

  • Cognitive behavioural therapy
  • Interpersonal psychotherapy
  • Couples therapy for depression
  • Behavioural couple's therapy

ABOUT US
Waltham Forest Talking Therapies IAPT is a service open to residents of Waltham Forest for those 18 years and over and whom are registered with a Waltham Forest GP. The service is available across the borough, including GP practices and community venues.

TAKE YOUR FIRST STEP
Call us on: 0300 300 1554

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019

BLOOD TESTING CLINICS
North East London NHS Foundation Trust has taken over the delivery of the Community and Domicillary Phlebotomy Service.

In order to deliver an improved service with more appointments available overall, blood testing services are available from:

  • Silverthorne Medical Centre, 2 Friars Close, E4 6UN, from 8.15am to 12.30pm and from 1.15pm to 4.00pm Monday to Friday
  • St James Health Practice, 47 St James St, Walthamstow, London E17 7NH, from 8.15am to 12.30pm Monday to Friday, with an afternoon clinic from 1.15pm to 5.30pm Monday to Friday
  • Langthorne Health Centre, 13 Langthorne Rd, London, E11 4HX, from 8.15am to 5.30pm Mondays Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and from 8.15am - 12.30pm on Thursdays

ONLINE BOOKINGS NOW AVAILABLE
Our patients can book or cancel blood test appointments online;

If patients are unable to book their own appointment, a relative or carer can register to book on their behalf.

Please note appointments cannot be pre-booked by telephone.

If you have been referred by your GP, book your blood test appointments online at;

https://www.swiftqueue.co.uk/pre_timescreen.php?id=10315

CRITERIA FOR HOME VISITS
Domiciliary phlebotomy will be provided to those who are confined to their homes due to illness, in care homes (with no nursing facilities) and or disability or learning disability with challenging behaviour and/non-urgent patient transport service to attend hospital appointments.

DOMICILARY PHLEBOTOMY
Referrals to the domiciliary phlebotomy service will be made via secure mail on the WF Adult SPA referral form to the WF Adult Single point of Access (SPA). Domiciliary referrals will be responded to within 2 days. Where the referral is urgent the phlebotomist shall attend to the patient within 4 days and for routine referrals within 2-3 weeks.

 

BLOOD TESTS FOR CHILDREN AGED 10 AND ABOVE
Please use the adult clinics listed above, with the support of a parent or a guardian

BLOOD TESTS FOR CHILDREN AGED 9 AND UNDER
Please visit the outpatient's at Whipps Cross Hospital Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9.30am - 3.30pm

CONTACT OUR SERVICE IN WALTHAM FOREST
The service will be provided to all patients who present a blood test request form.

Core Opening Hours: 8.00am – 5.30pm
Email: nem-tr.wfadultchsreferrals@nhs.net
Telephone Number:
030 0300 1710

Click here to download a referral form

For test results, please contact the practice between 2.30PM and 4.30PM

Please allow a minimum of 1 week for test results to be available.

Note that the practice has a strict policy regarding confidentiality and data protection and we will only release test results to the person to whom they relate unless that person has given prior permission for the release of this data or they are not capable of understanding the results.

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019
HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
Blood pressure, or hypertension, rarely has noticeable symptoms. But if untreated, it increases your risk of serious problems such as heart attacks and strokes.

More than one in four adults in the UK have high blood pressure, although many won't realise it.

The only way to find out if your blood pressure is high is to have your blood pressure checked. 

WHAT IS BLOOD PRESSURE?
Blood pressure is recorded with two numbers. The systolic pressure (higher number) is the force at which your heart pumps blood around your body.

The diastolic pressure (lower number) is the resistance to the blood flow in the blood vessels. They're both measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg).

As a general guide;

  • High blood pressure is considered to be 140/90mmHg or higher
  • Ideal blood pressure is considered to be between 90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg
  • Low blood pressure is considered to be 90/60mmHg or lower

A blood pressure reading between 120/80mmHg and 140/90mmHg could mean you're at risk of developing high blood pressure if you don't take steps to keep your blood pressure under control.

RISKS OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
If your blood pressure is too high, it puts extra strain on your blood vessels, heart and other organs, such as the brain, kidneys and eyes.

Persistent high blood pressure can increase your risk of a number of serious and potentially life-threatening conditions, such as;

  • Heart disease
  • Heart attacks
  • Strokes
  • Heart failure
  • Peripheral arterial disease
  • Aortic aneurysms
  • kydney disease
  • Vascular dementia

If you have high blood pressure, reducing it even a small amount can help lower your risk of these conditions

CHECK YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE
The only way of knowing whether you have high blood pressure is to have a blood pressure test.
All adults over 40 are advised to have their blood pressure checked at least every five years. Getting this done is easy and could save your life.

You can get your blood pressure tested at a number of places, including;

  • At your GP surgery
  • At some pharmacies
  • As part of your NHS Health Check
  • In some workplaces
  • A Home blood pressure monitor

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

CAUSES OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
It's not always clear what causes high blood pressure, but certain things can increase your risk.

You're at an increased risk of high blood pressure if you;

  • Are over the age of 65
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Are of African or Caribbean descent
  • Have a relative with high blood pressure
  • Eat too much salt and don't eat enough fruit and vegetables
  • Don't do enough exercise
  • Drink too much alcohol or coffee (or other caffeine-based drinks)
  • Smoke
  • Don't get much sleep or have disturbed sleep

Making healthy lifestyle changes can help reduce your chances of getting high blood pressure and help lower your blood pressure if it's already high.

REDUCE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE
The following lifestyle changes can help prevent and lower high blood pressure;

  • Reduce the amount of salt you eat and have a generally healthy diet
  • Cut back on alcohol if you drink too much
  • Lose weight if you're overweight
  • Exercise regularly
  • Cut down on caffeine
  • Stop smoking
  • Try to get at least six hours of sleep a night

Some people with high blood pressure may also need to take one or more medicines to stop their blood pressure getting too high.

MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
If you're diagnosed with high blood pressure, your doctor may recommend taking one or more medicines to keep it under control.
These usually need to be taken once a day.

Common blood pressure medications include;

  • ACE inhibitors – such as enalapril, lisinopril, perindopril and ramipril
  • Angiotensin-2 receptor blockers (ARBs) – such as candesartan, irbesartan, losartan, valsartan and olmesartan
  • Calcium channel blockers – such as amlodipine, felodipine and nifedipine or diltiazem and verapamil.
  • Diuretics – such as indapamide and bendroflumethiazide
  • Beta-blockers – such as atenolol and bisoprolol Alpha-blockers – such as doxazosin
  • Renin inhibitors – such as aliskiren
  • Other diuretics – such as amiloride and spironolactone

The medication recommended for you will depend on things like how high your blood pressure is and your age.

For test results, please contact the practice between 2.30PM and 4.30PM

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019
FAMILY PLANNING AND SEXUAL HEALTH
A full range of contraceptive services including the pill and injections are available, please make an appointment with the doctor. We offer screening for Chlamydia for patients aged between 16 and 24, both male and female.

CHLAMYDIA TESTING
Chlamydia is the most commonly diagnosed STI in England today and the rates are increasing. The test is offered to everyone between 15 and 25 years of age.

For most people, Chlamydia has no symptoms, so you don't know if you or your partner has it without taking a test. If you are sexually active and under 25 years of age, you should be tested for Chlamydia every year, or when you change your partner.

Untreated Chlamydia can have serious long-term health implications and you may not be able to have children in the future.

Any form of unprotected sex can put you at risk.

To book an your appointment please ask one of our receptionists to book your appointment

For test results, please contact the practice between 2.30PM and 4.30PM

Please note that not all immunsations are available on the NHS and you may have to pay

RESOURCES

All links come from trusted sources, however, if you are unsure about them or any other medical concerns, contact your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019

MEASLES

*IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT*

There have been serious outbreaks in England and Wales and the number of children catching measles is rising. Measles can be a very serious disease, leading to ear and chest infections, fits, diarrhoea, and damage to the brain.

Measles is very deadly and could cause death.

Your child is at risk of measles if he or she has not had the MMR vaccination.

  • 2 doses of the MMR vaccine are needed to ge the best protection
  • If your child is due to have had the 2 doses of MMR, but has not received them, no matter what age they are, you should book an appointment with 1 of our nurses as soon as possible
  • If you can't remember if your child has had 1 or 2 doses of the MMR vaccine, check his or her personal health check record (the Red Book). If this does not help contact one of our receptionists who can advise you more and book an appointment with 1 of our nurses
  • If you don't know how many doses your child has had, it's better to have 2 doses of the MMR vaccine now rather them being unprotected.
  • In response to the local outbreak, then the 2 doses can be given a month apart from the age of 18 months

For more infiormation about Measles and the MMR Vaccine, please visit,

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Measles/

ANSWERS TO COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT MEASLES AND THE MMR VACCINE

WHY ARE WE SEEING THESE OUTBRAKES OF THE MEASLES
Measles is highly infectious disease, spreading quickly from person to person, especially in schools. A child with measles can infect almost all unprotected children they have contact with.

Since the end of 2017 there has been an increase in the measles globally which has affected the UK.

This has resulted in some spread into wider communities, in particular undervaccinated groups.

 

WHEN ARE THE MMR VACCINATIONS USUALLY GIVEN?
The best times are between 12 and 13 months of age and again at 3 and 4 months, with one does per visit. But if your child wasn't vaccinated then they can be vaccinated at any age with 2 doses one month apart.

WILL THERE BE ANY SIDE EFFECTS TO THE VACCINATION?
Your child may get the symptoms of Measles, Mumps and Rubella for up to 6 weeks after the vaccination, but in a very much milder form.

This proves that the vaccine is working and that your child is buidling up resistance to future contact with the viruses that cause these diseases. Not al children show these symptoms but that does not mean that the vacciine is is not working.

SHOULD PARENTS IN OUTBREAK AREAS GET VACCINATED AGAINST MEASLES?
As with many diseases, once you have had Measles, you don't catch it again because you have built up a resistance to it. So if you've had measles, and had the 2 doses of the MMR vaccine, you do not need to get vaccinated now.

Website updated on Thursday 1st August 2019

 
MEASLE'S PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLETS AUGUST 2019
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